veterinary exam

Why Your Cat’s Vet Records Are So Important

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Your relationship with your cat’s veterinarian is one of the most important relationships in yours and your cat’s life. This relationship should be based on trust. Honest and open communication is important not only to ensure that your cat gets the best possible care, but that you understand every aspect of her care. Your vet will keep a detailed medical record for your cat.Continue Reading

A Cat Guardian’s Bill of Rights for Vet Visits

cat-vet-visit

America’s cats are not receiving the health care they deserve. The findings of a feline health study conducted by Bayer Health Care found that 52% of America’s 74 million cats are not receiving regular veterinary care. The actual number is probably much higher, since this study only captured data from cat guardians who do seek some veterinary care, not those who never take their cat to the vet. The study also showed that cat guardians are not willing to spend as much money on healthcare for their feline charges as dog guardians. Ironically, while spending on veterinary care is declining, spending on pet products is increasing steadily each year.Continue Reading

How to Prepare for Your Cat’s Veterinary Check Up

cat-in-carrier

America’s cats are not getting the healthcare they deserve. 83% of cats are taken to the vet during the first year after they’re adopted, yet over half of them don’t return for subsequent wellness visit. Given that cats age more rapidly than humans and are masters at masking illness, these statistics are disturbing. National Take Your Cat to the Vet Day, which takes place on August 22, is designed to improve awareness about the importance of regular, routine check ups.Continue Reading

Fear-Free Veterinary Visits for Your Cat

cat-vet-exam

“Fear is the worst thing a social species can experience.” This is how Dr. Marty Becker opened a presentation on his Fear-Free™ Initiative which I attended at the Central Veterinary Conference in Washington DC last month. Dr. Becker’s initiative is part of a growing and long overdue trend in the veterinary profession to minimize the fear and anxiety associated with veterinary visits for both pets and their guardians.

The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) was the first major veterinary organization to recognize the need for this movementContinue Reading

Fear in Cats: More Than Just an Emotional Problem During Veterinary Visits

fear-in-cats

Did you know that you can actually find the word “scaredy-cat” in the Merriam Webster dictionary? If you have one of those fearful cats, you already know that her fear may be affecting her quality of life. A fearful cat is a stressed cat. Fear or anxiety is more than just an emotional problem for cats. It can also cause many serious physical health problems and aggravate others.Continue Reading

How to Be the Purrfect Veterinary Client

veterinarian-and-cat

Veterinarians and their staff are some of the hardest working people around. They are dedicated to making pets’ lives better, and they often work long hours for very little compensation. More and more veterinary clinics are understanding cat’s unique needs, and as a result, more practices are becoming cat-friendly. But vets and their staff aren’t the only ones who are responsible for making your cat’s trip to the veterinary clinic as stress-free as possible. There are things cat guardians can do during a veterinary visit that will not only endear them to their vet and staff, but will also make the experience easier on your cat. Continue Reading

A Very Unusual Feline Housecall

Shasta_Abbey_cats

Guest post by Elizabeth Colleran, DVM

Editor’s Note: Shasta Abbey, a Buddist monastery at the foot of Mount Shasta in Northern California, is home to 12 cats, ranging in age from 3 to 18. Read The Cats at Shasta Abbey for more about this very special place.

My friend and great assistant and I are both Buddhists. We help out at Shasta Abbey when we can. It is a way for me to offer my veterinary expertise to the community of abbey cats in the Buddhist tradition of “dana,” which means giving with generosity. We try to make these “housecall visits” twice a year. Continue Reading

Less is More When it Comes To Handling Cats in the Veterinary Clinic

cat_with_vet

The findings of a feline health study conducted by Bayer Health Care revealed that 52% of America’s 74 million cats are not receiving regular veterinary care. I would bet that the actual number is probably much higher, since this study only captured data from cat guardians who do seek some veterinary care, not those who never take their cat to the vet. And while some of this may be due to cat guardians not understanding how vitally important regular veterinary care is for your cat’s health, it may also be due to the fact that most cats hate going to the veterinary clinic.

The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) has been educating veterinarians and veterinary staff on how to make practices more cat-friendlyContinue Reading

How to Get Your Cat Used to the Carrier

cat-in-carrier

A cat carrier is an important part of your cat’s life. For most cats, the only time they’re in a carrier is when they have to go to the veterinarian, so the association with carriers is often a negative and stressful one. But carriers can be vital in an emergency, and it’s a good idea to get your cats used to the carrier so that they can associate it with a positive experience.

Pick the right carrier

Carriers come in all shapes and sizes, from hard-sided crates to soft-sided carrying cases,and it comes down to your preference and your cat’s as to which one you choose. Make sure that the carrier is large enough for your cat to be able to stand and turn around in it comfortably. If you plan to travel with your cat, a larger carrier that can accommodate a small litter box may be a good choice.Continue Reading