stress relief

Are You Stressing Your Cat Out?

stressed_cat

What in the world could possibly stress out a cat? They have their every need met by their faithful human servants, and are blessed with the freedom to do whatever they want with their days, whether it’s sleeping on the sofa, sunbathing in a windowsill, or playing with their favorite toys. To us, with our hectic schedules, deadlines and worries, it may seem an enviable life.

But the fact is, a lot of things can stress your feline companion and even make him ill. For example, most cats like their familiar routines, so anything out of the ordinary, whether it’s another new cat, a move, home remodeling, or even a change in the position of household furnishings, can cause them to feel stressed. In addition to changes in the environment, your cat can also be negatively affected by your own stress.Continue Reading

Review: Music My Pet: soothing classical music for cats

relaxing music for pets

When Tom Nazziola, the creator of Music My Pet, contacted me about reviewing some of the music he created specifically for animals to provide comfort and soothe anxiety, I was intrigued.

Nazziola’s music, ranging from film music to choral and orchestral pieces, has been performed around the world, as well as broadcast nationally and internationally on radio and television. But what really grabbed my attention was that Tom served as one of the principal performers for Disney’s award-winning Baby Einstein CDs and DVDs for more than 10 years. These CD’s and DVD’s are designed to enlighten and entertain children of all ages. “I’ve always been fascinated by the effects of music on people,” says Tom, “and I was curious as to how classical music in particular affects pets – especially those that suffer from anxiety.”

Studies have shown that pets respond favorably to classical music Continue Reading

Conscious Cat Sunday: playing hooky

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Ruby wants to know: when was the last time you played hooky?

There’s a reason it’s called a mental-health day. Studies show that taking time off, even if it’s just for a few hours, relieves stress, lowers blood pressure and reduces the risk of heart disease.

Clearly, Ferris Bueller was right all those years ago: we all need a break now and then. Whether it’s catching up on some much needed rest, doing something fun to recharge our batteries, or just hanging out with our cats, sometimes, you just have to blow off work.

This can be challenging for those of us who are self-employed, especially if we love what we do.Continue Reading

Mood music for cats

soothing-music-for-cats

Playing soft music has been shown to reduce stress in humans and animals alike. Some feline behaviorists say that playing relaxing music can keep cats calm and even stop them from fighting with other cats in the same household. A recent study at Colorado State University is looking at how classical music can help make a veterinary visit less stressful and thus lead to better veterinary care for cats.

I recently came across a cd made especially for cats. Mood Music For Cats (And Cat Lovers) –  A Ball of Twine… Your Cat’s First CD is a collection of soothing tunes blending piano, harp and strings, with title tracks such as Tuna Sonata, Vet Visit Blues, and Catatonia.

The music is truly beautiful. Continue Reading

Could your stress make your cat sick?

stressed cat

Stress, whether physiological or emotional, is the root cause of illness for humans as well as pets. We may wonder, as we look at our feline charges sleeping the day away on the sofa, what in the world could possibly cause them to be stressed out?

Actually, a lot of things.  Since most cats prefer familiar routines, anything from other cats in the household to a new baby, a move, remodeling, or even just furniture being moved around can create feline stress.Continue Reading

Stress and Your Pets

catanddog

We live in challenging times and external stressors abound.  The economy, the news, and often just getting through the day all present a source of stress for people.  It’s been long proven that owning a pet has beneficial effects on our health.  Studies have shown that even a few minutes of petting your cat or dog can lower your blood pressure and release endorphins that put you in a better mood.  Pets are the greatest source of stress relief and masters at showing us not only how to relax, but how to live in the moment without worrying about the future. 

So we know that our pets help us be less stressed.  But did you know that your stress can make your pets sick? 

People and pets often mirror each others’ physical and emotional states.  Animals are natural healers and sometimes take on their person’s problems, often in an attempt to heal them.  This happens because of the deep bond shared between a pet and his or her person.  Because of the shared energy in such a close relationship, energetic imbalances are shared as well. 

Unfortunately stress has the same detrimental effect on our pets’ bodies at it does on ours.  Since pets are so sensitive to our emotions, they can become sick as a result of our stress. 

Dr. Fern Crist, of The Cat Hospital of Fairfax, says: “As a veterinarian, I frequently see cats who are urinating outside the litterbox.  While this undesirable behavior may be caused by a variety of medical problems, it can also be caused or exacerbated by stress.  It may be the cat’s stress, such as having a new cat to adjust to in the house; but it can just as easily be the owner’s stress.  The emotional turmoil brought on by such difficulties as household financial problems, frequent job travel, marital differences, new babies, and home remodeling can affect our cats in very tangible ways.  Our stress can induce undesirable behaviors in our cats, such as inappropriate urination. More importantly, our stress can also influence the development of actual physical illness in our cats as well as in ourselves.  As responsible owners, we sometimes need to take a good look at ourselves when we ask why our pets are having problems.  Stress relief for pet owners won’t solve every pet health problem, but can go a long way toward alleviating many of them.” 

All of this shows us that stress relief is not only important for our own health and well-being, it’s also good for our pets.