preventive health care

Support Your Cat’s Immune System

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The immune system is an intricate system of biological processes and structures that protects the body against disease. A healthy immune system is able to recognize and fend off invaders such as viruses, bacteria, and other pathogens. Keeping your cat’s immune system strong will help prevent health problems and protect her against disease.

In order to protect and boost your cat’s immune system, consider the following:Continue Reading

Free e-book: 6 Natural Ways to Help your Cat Live Longer by Liz Eastwood

6 natural ways to help your cat live longer

Liz Eastwood, the publisher of the Natural Cat Care Blog, has put together a wonderful e-book titled 6 Natural Ways to Help Your Cat Live Longer.

When Liz, a certified nutritionist, lost her soulmate cat Bastet to cancer at barely 12 years of age, she was shocked and devastated. Says Liz “most people seemed to think that it was perfectly normal for a cat to get cancer and die,” but Liz refused to accept that. Her childhood cat had lived much longer than Bastet, even though, on the surface, he hadn’t received nearly as good care as what she thought she gave Bastet.

With a background in holistic health, plus some of her own “miracle” health changes through natural means, Liz knew there must be something she could do differently in order to help her dearest feline friends live longer. So Liz began her research. She put a lot of time into it because she wanted to know – and share – how to help cats live to be 20 years old.

Topics in Liz’ book include:Continue Reading

Bloodwork for your pet: what it means and why your pet needs it

Regular and routine blood testing is an important part of your pet’s preventive healthcare.  It used to be that veterinarians only recommended blood work for older pets, but it’s equally important for younger healthy pets.  It’s the best way to detect potential health problems before they become evident through symptoms.  It’s also critically important before your pet undergoes any kind of anesthetic procedure, even a routine dental cleaning.

Typically, your vet will run a blood chemistry panel and a complete bloodcount. The College of Veterinary Medicine of Washington State University has an excellent explanation of what these lab tests mean.

Amber, who is probably 11 years old (best guess – she was a stray when I got her as a young adult), gets complete veterinary exams and blood work (CBC, chemistry and thyroid) twice a year.