lawn chemicals

Why You Shouldn’t Wear Shoes Inside the House

kitten-with-shoes

I keep my house clean, but I’m by no means a germophobe or a neat freak. I vacuum twice a week, and do a more thorough cleaning once a week that includes bathrooms, dusting and washing hard floors. I’m also pretty tolerant of other peoples’ habits. But when it comes to wearing street shoes inside my house, there is no grey zone for me: I don’t allow it. And the main reason for this is that I don’t want to expose Allegra and Ruby to all the bacteria and toxins that live on the bottom of the average shoe.Continue Reading

How Lawn Chemicals Affect Your Cats – Even Indoor Cats

cats_lawn_chemicals

When I go for my daily walks in my suburban neighborhood this time of year, not a day goes by that someone hasn’t just fertilized their lawn. I can see the granules on the sidewalk, and sometimes, I can even smell the chemicals. I am strongly opposed to the use of chemical fertilizers, and I don’t understand the obsession with flawless green lawns. But mostly, I worry about the effect lawn chemicals have on the cats who come in contact with them – and that can happen even if your cats never leave the house.

There is no question that lawn fertilizers and pesticides are hazardous to pets and humans.  Pets especially can absorb pesticides through their paws or lick them offContinue Reading

Pets and Lawn Chemicals – Not a Good Combination

cat_and_dog_on_grass

While a green lawn is pretty to look at, you should think twice about how you go about achieving that lush, green look.   The pesticides we apply to our lawns and gardens are hazardous to our pets.  Pets can absorb pesticides through their paws or lick it off their bodies. In addition, pets can be exposed to pesticides when they eat grass.   Some of the chemicals found in herbicides are also easily tracked indoors on your shoes.  An EPA funded study in 2001 found that 2,4-D and dicamba (a chemical used in herbicides) are easily tracked indoors, contaminating the air and surfaces inside residences and exposing children and pets at levels ten times higher than pre-application levels.

This should be enough to make any pet owner think twice about using chemical fertilizers.  There are plenty of natural and organic alternatives to these chemicals that are not only safer for your pets, but also friendlier to the environment.

Insecticide and pesticide poisoning is always an emergency situation and requires immediate veterinary attention.  Symptoms of insecticide poisoning are:

• Excessive salivation
• Tearing of the eyes
• Excessive urination
• Muscle twitching
• Weakness
• Difficult breathing
• Collapse
• Nausea
• Vomiting
• Abdominal pain
• Weakness
• Dizziness
• Unsteady gait

Repeated exposure to phenoxy herbicides (example: 2,4-D) may affect the liver, kidneys, gastrointestinal tract and skeletal muscles. Some pesticides contain chlorophenoxy acids and are poisonous to the blood, leading to anemia, neutropenia (low white blood cell count), thrombocytopenia (low platelet count), and feline distemper.

Don’t put your pets’ health at risk – look for natural alternatives to keep your lawn green and your yard weed-free.