stomatitis

How the Assisi Loop Helps Shade With Stomatitis

assisi-loop-stomatitis

This post is sponsored by Assisi Animal Health

Shade is an almost 2-yearold Domestic Shorthair who shares his home with Stephanie, her husband Aaron and cats Ripley and Lucy in Camp Hill, PA. Shade was rescued from a feral cat colony as a kitten, and Stephanie adopted him when he was 4 months old.

Shade was a very quiet cat, and he had bad breath. Stephanie tried brushing his teeth in hopes it would help. His breath smelled better for a week or two, but the effect didn’t last. He also didn’t take to brushing very well. She tried dental treats, but he didn’t eat them. Shade also got a prebiotic powder to help with some intestinal issues.Continue Reading

Stem Cell Therapy Helps Cat with Stomatitis

Bob_the_cat

Stomatitis is is one of the most painful conditions cats can develop. Buckley suffered from this condition; a severe inflammation of the oral cavity in which the affected cat essentially becomes allergic to her own teeth. The outward signs of this condition are red, inflamed, often ulcerated gums. This can be extremely painful for cats. Treatment of this condition can be very frustrating. The goal is to control the inflammatory response. In many cases, a complete resolution of the problem may never be achieved.

Current treatment of stomatitis

To date, treatment usually involves a complete removal of all teeth. This approach Continue Reading

Stomatitis: Painful for Cats, Frustrating for Guardians and Veterinarians

tortoiseshell-cat-window

Stomatitis is is one of the most painful and frustrating conditions cats can develop. Buckley suffered from this condition; a severe inflammation of the oral cavity in cats in which the affected cat essentially becomes allergic to her own teeth. The outward signs of this condition are red, inflamed, and often ulcerated gums, and this can be very painful for the cat.Continue Reading

Tooth Resorption: A Painfully Common Dental Disease in Cats

cat-yawning-teeth-tongue

Guest post by Dr. Karen Becker

When a kitty has oral disease, it generally has one of four causes:

  • Periodontal (gum) disease
  • Oral cancer (especially squamous cell carcinoma)
  • Feline stomatitis (an autoimmune disorder that causes painful inflammation of the mouth, throat or pharynx)
  • Tooth resorption

Tooth resorption is also referred to as cervical line lesions, resorptive lesions, feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions (FORLs), and (inaccurately) cavities. Of the four major feline oral diseases, tooth resorption is the most common. Estimates are the condition affects between about 30 to 40 percent of healthy adult cats, and from 60 to 80 percent of kitties who visit the vet for treatment of dental disease.Continue Reading