prescription diet

The Right Diet for Cats with Kidney Disease

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Guest post by Dr. Elizabeth Colleran

Frequently, the first advice guardians of a cat who was just diagnosed with kidney disease hear from the veterinarian is that the cat should eat a renal “prescription diet”. That’s because there are research trials that have shown that restricted protein diets can prolong renal function. However, there is more to feeding a cat with compromised kidney function than simply restricting protein. The consequences of making poor dietary choices in these cats can be dire.Continue Reading

Prescription Diets May Not Be a Good Nutritional Choice for Your Cat

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You’ve probably seen them on the shelves at your local veterinary hospital, or maybe your cat is currently eating one of these foods: so-called prescription diets that are formulated for cats with specific health conditions ranging from allergies to gastro-intestinal problems to kidney disease. Also known as therapeutic diets, you would think that these diets are high quality diets that are good for your cats, right?

You couldn’t be further from the truth. The majority of these diets are very high in carbohydrates and contain wheat, corn and soy – ingredients that have no logical place in the diet of an obligate carnivore like the cat. They also generally contain a high amount of by-products.Continue Reading

Can a New Prescription Food Really Cure Your Cat’s Hyperthyroidism?

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For the past few months, the veterinary community has been bombarded with ads for a new feline prescription food that is said to cure hyperthyroidism in 3 weeks.

When the diet first came out, I was skeptical. I’m not a fan of prescription diets. While I respect the research that goes into these diets, sadly, they usually contain ingredients such as meat by-products, corn, soy and grains, none of which are optimal for an obligate carnivore like the cat.

Hyperthyroidism is a common disease that typically affects middle-aged and older cats.  It is caused by an excess production of thyroid hormones, which are produced by the thyroid gland, located inside the cat’s neck. Thyroid hormones affect nearly all organs, which is why thyroid disease can sometimes cause secondary problems such as hypertension, heart and kidney disease.

There are currently three treatment options:Continue Reading