medication

Dry Pilling Cats: Uncomfortable, and Potentially Dangerous

cat-pill-medication

Pilling cats can be challenging, to say the least. Even if you mange to get your cat to take pills by popping them directly into her mouth, you may be doing more harm than good. This practice is known as “dry pilling,” and it can not only be uncomfortable for your cat, it can cause serious damage to the delicate lining of the esophagus.

Think about the last time you took a pill or capsule. You most likely took it with a glass of water. And even if you did, depending on the size of the pill, it may have gotten lodged halfway down. Remember that uncomfortable feeling? You probably immediately drank some more water. Unfortunately, our cats don’t have the instinct to do that if something gets stuck in their esophagus.Continue Reading

Review: DIY Capsule Kit for Cats

Capsuline-capsule-kit

Rumor has it there are some cats who take pills easily, but if my personal experience and that with my readers’ and clients’ cats is any indication, they’re few and far between.

There are multiple options for pilling cats, from quickly shoving the pill deep into the cat’s mouth to using a pill gun to pill pockets to crushing up the pill and mixing it with a small amount of food (caution: the latter may not be appropriate for all types of medication, check with your veterinarian to be sure). Many medications are also available in liquid form, which may make dosing easier for some cat owners. Some can even be compounded into tuna or chicken flavored liquids. Some medications can be compounded into a transdermal cream that is rubbed on the inside of the cat’s ear. Continue Reading

Giveaway: CATCaps Gift Pack

CATcaps

This giveaway is sponsored by Capsuline

Pilling cats can be challenging. One option that can make the process easier is using empty gel caps. Since they’re capsules, they slide down the cat’s esophagus easily. They are especially useful for cats who are taking multiple medications at the same time: simply open the capsule, put all the meds in the capsule together, and administer. Instead of having to give multiple pills, you only have to pill your cat once.

Gel caps also avoid the dangers of “dry pilling” (giving pills without following with a syringe full of water) a practice that can cause serious damage to the delicate lining of the esophagus.Continue Reading

The Tiger Effect: Why I Use Silver Vine to Successfully Medicate Grumpy Cats

tiger

Guest post by Dr. Kristopher Chandroo

Maybe he’s a grumpy tiger you share a living space with. Or maybe you both live on a large park reserve. And you need the tiger to cooperate. The tiger needs to listen to you, and perhaps take food, a treat, or a medication from your hand.

The tiger is faster than you, and stronger. She could take control of the situation at any second.

What do you do?Continue Reading

Stress to Success: The Essential Guide to Medicating Your Feisty, Grumpy or Reluctant Cat

medicating-cats

When it comes to giving pills to pets, dog owners tend to have it easier. Put the pill in a little bit of peanut butter or cheese and most dogs will think they’re getting a treat and won’t argue with the owner. When it comes to cats, it’s usually not quite that simple. Rumor has it there are some cats who will allow their humans to pill them easily, but if my personal experience and that with veterinary clients is any indication, they’re few and far between.Continue Reading

Feeding Tubes Save Lives

feeding tubes

There is nothing more frustrating, and worrisome, than a sick cat who won’t eat. Cats may refuse to eat for many reasons. They may be bored with the same old food, or they may be stressed about something. Most often, though, inappetence and anorexia will be caused by an illness, either because the cat feels nauseated or can’t smell her food. A cat who doesn’t eat for more than 48 hours is at risk for developing hepatic lipidosis, also known as fatty liver disease, which can be fatal if left untreated.Continue Reading

Should You Buy Your Cat’s Medication Online?

cat with medication

I’m sure you’ve seen the claims: “Discounted pet drugs! No prescription necessary! Convenient home delivery!” There’s no question that prescription drugs are expensive, but is it really such a good idea to buy your cat’s medications online?

There are reputable internet pharmacies that sell pet drugs at a discounted price, but there are others that violate federal, state, and sometimes international pharmacy laws. Continue Reading

What You Should Know When Your Cat Needs to Go Under Anesthesia

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Most cat guardians worry when their cats have to go under anesthesia. I’m certainly one of them. Even though I’ve assisted with all sorts of anesthetic procedures and surgeries in my years working in veterinary clinics, understanding how it all works, and what constitutes safe anesthetic practice, still doesn’t completely take the worry out of it.

Knowing what to expect when your cat has to undergo anesthesia, and knowing the right questions to ask at your veterinary clinic prior to the procedure so that you can be sure that  your cat’s anesthesia will be done in the safest possible way, can help ease the worry factor.

The recently released AAHA anesthesia guidelines for dogs and cats (AAHA is the American Animal Hospital Association) cover the entire process from pre-anesthetic evaluation to recovery. Make sure that at a minimum, your vet adheres to these guidelines.

Here’s what happens prior to, during and after anesthesia:Continue Reading

Nursing Care for Your Cat

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When your cat is recovering from a serious illness, surgery or an accident, she may require extended nursing care when she returns from the veterinary hospital. Providing nursing care can seem overwhelming, but most cats will recover more quickly if they’re at home in their familiar environment with the person they love.

The following tips can help take the stress out of caring for your cat after an illness or accident.

Provide a safe and quiet place for her to recuperate

Your cat’s personality, and the severity of the illness, will determine the right approach. If your cat seems to do better if she can access all her familiar places, than by all means, let her do so. But if she seems to want to just stay in one place, make the area as comfortable as you can for her. Provide plenty of blankets and soft bedding, and make sure that she has easy access to a litter box and fresh water.

Encourage your cat to eat

Try using flat dishes or paper plates.Continue Reading

How to pill a cat, take two

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Last month, I published a post on how to pill a cat, filled with tips and tricks to help even reluctant felines take their medications.

This week, I’m offering a humorous take on the subject. You’ve probably seen it before, but it makes me laugh every time I come across it, so I thought I’d share it with you. There are several versions of this floating around on the internet. This version is generally attributed to Peggy Althoff.

  1. Grasp cat firmly in your arms. Cradle its head on your elbow, just as if you were giving baby a bottle. Coo confidently, “Thats a nice kitty.” Drop pill into its mouth.
  2. Retrieve cat from top of lamp and pill from under sofa.
  3. Follow same procedure as in 1, but hold cat’s front paws down with left hand and back paws down with elbow of right arm. Poke pill into its mouth with right forefinger.Continue Reading