Halloween

Halloween Costumes for Cats: Just Say No

Halloween_cats

It happens every year around this time: every pet store you walk into has Halloween costumes for pets for sale. Your Facebook feed explodes with photos of cats and dogs in costumes. Admittedly, some of the photos are adorable. But do you really think cats, if asked, would want to dress up in anything but their own beautiful fur coats?Continue Reading

Purrfect Halloween Decor from KittyCat Art Studio

Halloween-witch-cat

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Even though I don’t usually decorate much for Halloween, these days I’m all for anything that brings a little extra happiness into my home. And these adorable ornaments will definitely bring a bit of joy during these challenging times.Continue Reading

Halloween Cat Ornaments from KittyCat Art Studio

tortoiseshell-cat-halloween-ornament

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We still have a couple of weeks of summer left to enjoy, but I know many of you are looking forward to fall, and of course, with fall comes Halloween! I usually don’t decorate for Halloween, but this year, I’m planning to do so, and do it early, to bring a little extra happiness into my home. And these adorable ornaments will definitely bring a little joy during these challenging times. Continue Reading

Halloween Safety Tips for Your Cats

cat-pumpkin-halloween

I’m pretty sure that if cats had anything to say about it, they’d get rid of Halloween. From a cat’s perspective, there’s not much to love about a holiday when strangers come knocking at your door, your humans dress up in weird outfits and scary looking masks, and some  humans even try to put you in costumes. It’s up to us humans to reduce the stress of this holiday for feline family members and keep them safe so everyone can have a happy Halloween.Continue Reading

Keep Your Cats Safe and Happy at Halloween

Halloween_cats

I bet if cats had their say, they’d abolish Halloween. From a cat’s perspective, there’s not much to love about a holiday when strangers come knocking at your door, your humans dress up in weird outfits and scary looking masks, and some  humans even try to put you in costumes. The following tips will help you reduce the stress of this holiday for your feline family members and keep them safe so everyone can have a happy Halloween.Continue Reading

Boo! Special Sunday giveaway: Halloween toys for your kitties

Moderncat Halloween cat toys

We usually don’t do giveaways on Sundays, but when Kate Benjamin offered to give away one of Moderncat’s Limited Edition Halloween Cat Toy Gift Sets, we wanted to make sure that we ran this giveaway with enough time so the winner could have the toys in time for Halloween!

Allegra and Ruby got an early Halloween surprise when our set arrived in the mail earlier this week. I think the big smile on Allegra’s face describes better than words how much she and Ruby love the toys! The set contains ModKickers, ModShakers, Stacks, Felt Rollers and more. All of the toys are handmade in the US. And let me tell you, the catnip in the toys, and in the little cylinder that comes with the set, is potent stuff! The girls went nuts when I opened the box, and I think I may have gotten a contact high!

Allegra with Halloween toys

And now you can win one of these fun sets for your kitties!Continue Reading

No Scaredy Cats this Halloween – Safety Tips for Your Pets

black_cat_with_pumpkin_Halloween

It’s that time of year again – as ghost and goblins delight us with their spooky mischief and thoughts turn to trick or treating, the ASPCA offers the following tips to keep your furry family members safe this Halloween.

1.  No tricks, no treats: That bowlful of candy is for trick-or-treaters, not for Scruffy and Fluffy.  Chocolate in all forms – especially dark or baking chocolate – can be very dangerous for dogs and cats. Symptoms of significant chocolate ingestion may include vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, increased thirst, urination and heart rate-and even seizures.  Candies containing the artificial sweetener xylitol can be poisonous to dogs. Even small amounts of xylitol sweetener can cause a sudden drop in blood sugar, which leads to depression, lack of coordination and seizures. In cases of significantly low blood sugar, liver failure has been known to occur.  Ingesting tin foil and cellophane candy wrappers can pose a choking hazard or cause intestinal blockage.

2. Popular Halloween plants such as pumpkins and decorative corn are considered to be relatively nontoxic, yet they can produce gastrointestinal upset should pets ingest them. Intestinal blockage could even occur if large pieces are swallowed.

3. Keep wires and cords from electric lights and other decorations out of reach of your pets. If chewed, your pet could experience damage to his mouth from shards of glass or plastic, or receive a possibly life-threatening electrical shock.

4. A carved pumpkin certainly is festive, but do exercise extreme caution if you choose to add a candle. Pets can easily knock a lit pumpkin over and cause a fire. Curious kittens especially run the risk of getting burned or singed by candle flames.

5. Dress-up can be a big mess-up for some pets. Please don’t put your dog or cat in a costume UNLESS you know he or she loves it (yup, a few pets are real hams!). For pets who prefer their “birthday suits,” however, wearing a costume can cause undue stress.

6. If you do dress up your pet, make sure the costume isn’t annoying or unsafe. It should not constrict the animal’s movement or hearing, or impede his ability to breathe, bark or meow. Also try on costumes before the big night. If your pet seems distressed, allergic or shows abnormal behavior, consider letting him go au naturale or donning a festive bandana.

7. Take a closer look at your pet’s costume and make sure it does not have small, dangling or easily chewed-off pieces that he could choke on. Also, ill-fitting outfits can get twisted on external objects or your pet, leading to injury.

8. All but the most social dogs and cats should be kept in a separate room away from the front door during peak trick-or-treat visiting hours. Too many strangers can be scary and stressful for pets.

9. When opening the door for trick-or-treaters, take care that your cat or dog doesn’t dart outside.

10. IDs, please! Always make sure your dog or cat has proper identification. If for any reason your pet escapes and becomes lost, a collar and tags and/or a microchip can increase the chances that he or she will be returned to you.

The ASPCA works to rescue animals from abuse, pass humane laws and share resources with shelters nationwide. Learn more about them by visiting http://www.aspca.org.

Photo by Alisha Vargas, Flickr Creative Commons

Halloween Safety Tips for Your Pets

Halloween pets

As Halloween approaches and our thoughts turn to ghost and goblins, trick or treating, and parties, remember that some Halloween traditions are hazardous to your pets’ health. 

The ASPCA offers these common-sense cautions that’ll help keep your pets safe and stress-free this time of year. If you do suspect your pet has ingested a potentially dangerous substance, please call your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435.

1. No tricks, no treats: That bowlful of candy is for trick-or-treaters, not for Scruffy and Fluffy.

Chocolate in all forms-especially dark or baking chocolate-can be very dangerous for dogs and cats. Symptoms of significant chocolate ingestion may include vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, increased thirst, urination and heart rate-and even seizures.

Candies containing the artificial sweetener xylitol can be poisonous to dogs. Even small amounts of xylitol sweetener can cause a sudden drop in blood sugar, which leads to depression, lack of coordination and seizures. In cases of significantly low blood sugar, liver failure has been known to occur.

Ingesting tin foil and cellophane candy wrappers can pose a choking hazard or cause intestinal blockage.

2. Popular Halloween plants such as pumpkins and decorative corn are considered to be relatively nontoxic, yet they can produce gastrointestinal upset should pets ingest them. Intestinal blockage could even occur if large pieces are swallowed.

3. Keep wires and cords from electric lights and other decorations out of reach of your pets. If chewed, your pet could experience damage to his mouth from shards of glass or plastic, or receive a possibly life-threatening electrical shock.

4. A carved pumpkin certainly is festive, but do exercise extreme caution if you choose to add a candle. Pets can easily knock a lit pumpkin over and cause a fire. Curious kittens especially run the risk of getting burned or singed by candle flames.

5. Dress-up can be a big mess-up for some pets. Please don’t put your dog or cat in a costume UNLESS you know he or she loves it (yup, a few pets are real hams!). For pets who prefer their “birthday suits,” however, wearing a costume can cause undue stress.

6. If you do dress up your pet, make sure the costume isn’t annoying or unsafe. It should not constrict the animal’s movement or hearing, or impede his ability to breathe, bark or meow. Also try on costumes before the big night. If your pet seems distressed, allergic or shows abnormal behavior, consider letting him go au naturel or donning a festive bandana.

7. Take a closer look at your pet’s costume and make sure it does not have small, dangling or easily chewed-off pieces that he could choke on. Also, ill-fitting outfits can get twisted on external objects or your pet, leading to injury.

8. All but the most social dogs and cats should be kept in a separate room away from the front door during peak trick-or-treat visiting hours. Too many strangers can be scary and stressful for pets.

9. When opening the door for trick-or-treaters, take care that your cat or dog doesn’t dart outside.

10. IDs, please! Always make sure your dog or cat has proper identification. If for any reason your pet escapes and become lost, a collar and tags and/or a microchip can increase the chances that he or she will be returned to you.