cat paintings

King of Mice Studios: The Art of Carolee Clark

maine-coon-carolee-clark

On March 17, which is the Feast of St. Gertrude of Nivelles, the patron saint of cats, I came across this beautiful painting on Facebook. The painting had gone viral, and I wanted to learn more about the artist, Carolee Clark. I’m delighted that she agreed to answer a few questions and share some of her beautiful cat paintings with us.Continue Reading

Gatos Ilimitados: Meet Cat Artist Adriana Gasperi

 Gatos-Ilimitados

This is a sponsored post

Adriana Gasperi is an international artist referred to as “Gatos ilimitados” for her unique and popular portrayal of cats. The artist, who lives in Venezuela, is recognized for personifying the cherished feline and its multi-faceted personalities. Her art combines her lifelong interest in painting and drawing and her proficiency in color, design, and computer programs. She adorns the faces and bodies of her subjects with colorful designs inspired by Indian and Mexican motifs. Her paintings have been shown in one-person and group exhibitions worldwide. They include those held at Galería Intramuros in Caracas, Venezuela, the Cat Art Show Los Angeles, and the Tokyo International Art Fair 2016, among others. Her paintings are in numerous private collections in Europe, South America and the United States.Continue Reading

Giveaway: win an autographed copy of Cat Laughs by Gary Patterson

Cat_laughs_Gary_Patterson

Last week, I introduced you to Gary Patterson and his whimsical paintings of cats. His distinctive style captures cats’ essence in ways that will inevitably make you smile.

I’m delighted to be able to offer an autographed copy of Gary’s book Cat Laughs to five lucky winners! Gary presents the funny side of felines in this little volume, and anyone who likes a great laugh will enjoy this catnip-worthy collection of cat comedy. The book is hard to find and is considered a collector’s item.

To enter the giveaway, Continue Reading

Gary Patterson captures cats’ unique essence

Gary_Patterson_cat_drawings

As far as artists go, Gary Patterson is probably a household name in America. You may not know him by name, but I’m pretty sure that at some point, you’ve come across his distinctive artwork in some shape or form. Since some of Gary’s whimsical paintings feature cats, I wanted to learn more about the man behind the smiles.

Gary Patterson is one of America’s best loved artists, and his work is enjoyed and collected throughout the world. Born and raised in California, Gary submerged himself in the world of art as a child. He was influenced by his father’s artistic ability and was encouraged by his family to formally pursue his artistic ability. During his career, Gary has achieved numerous prestigious awards.

I had a chance to ask Gary a few questions, and I’m delighted to introduce this wonderful artist to you today.Continue Reading

Meet BZTAT, artist, writer and cat advocate

Orange-tortoise-shell-cat-pop-art-painting-bztat-LR

Artist Vicki Boatright, known as “BZTAT” (pronounced bee-zee-tat), is an accomplished artist with several public art projects to her credit. An avid pet lover and business partner to her cat Brewskie Butt, Vicki specializes in whimsical drawings, paintings and prints of cats, dogs and other companion animals. She creates colorful customized pet portraits, which are unique in their original contemporary style. Vicki also creates murals and other artworks that address a variety of themes.

I’m delighted to welcome Vicki to The Conscious Cat today.

When did you first realize that you were an artist?

I cannot remember a time in my life where I was not creating. Being an artist is something I am, not something I do. I remember drawing and doodling and coloring, etc. when I was very small, and I never stopped!

cat_painting_BZTAT

Your unique style is instantly recognizable. How did you develop this style?Continue Reading

Meet Wendy Christensen, cat artist, cat writer and consummate cat lover

Wendy Christensen portrait

Wendy Christensen writes and paints at Bobcat Mountain Studios, high on a wooded hillside in rural New Hampshire. She shares her home with her scientist husband, over 10,000 books, and the family of dear feline muses who daily inspire, amuse, mystify and comfort her — and serve as her models. 

Wendy is a cultural ailurologist (student of feline social and cultural life); award-winning writer, artist and illustrator; painter of cat portraits; designer and builder of cat jewelry; cat behavior consultant; and pet columnist.Continue Reading

An Interview with Animal Artist Bernadette Kazmarski

It’s hard to know where to begin to introduce Bernadette Kazmarski.  She is a multi-faceted creative spirit:  artist, writer, graphic designer, painter, animal advocate, environmentalist.  I met Bernadette at the Cat Writers Association conference last November, and I’ve been fascinated by her creations ever since.  From commissioned pet portraits to animal inspired merchandise ranging from prints to textiles to greeting cards, looking around Bernadette’s websites are a feast for the senses.  It’s my pleasure to introduce this wonderful artist to you today.

Welcome to The Conscious Cat, Bernadette! 

Hello, Ingrid, and thank you for inviting me! And also thank you for visiting my website and giving me a “positive review”.

You told me that you have your cats to thank for being an artist.  How did they inspire you?

At a time in my life when my artwork was ready to emerge, they were there as my muse. I studied English in college and intended to be a writer and a college professor, and someday take the time to follow my interest in art, but I never thought I had much talent. My career plans changed and I found myself with some time after work as a typesetter at the end of the day, and was moved to try drawing again on my own. I was visualizing sketches of my cats, and I’m convinced that those first sketches were successful because of how I loved my cats.  If that family of cats hadn’t been there, I don’t know that I would have continued, or even made a serious start at drawing and painting.

I was first introduced to your work through the sample greeting card you enclosed with the materials at the Cat Writers Conference .  My package had Cookie Looks at Me in it, and I thought it was one of the most beautiful cards I’d ever seen.  Tell us a little bit about how you came to create the cards.

How wonderful that you, with your special love of tortie cats, got the card featuring my special tortie out of the dozen different samples I had brought with me!

They came from the experience of many losses. I had always had the idea in mind for general animal sympathy cards, but knew I was waiting for a “cat”alyst, inspiration from my cats, and I was also waiting for my design ideas to mature so that I had a diversity of ideas to offer to others instead of my more personal sentiments.

I had lost cats in the past, but endured the loss of most of my household in a short period of time. Between February 2006 to January 2007, I lost my four oldest cats, one to cancer, one to kidney failure, the other two just to old age. Those two, Stanley and Moses, were the last two of the ones who had been with me from those earliest days and seen me begin my career as an artist.  They were also my first teachers as I worked to learn about feline health. Moses, the first loss of the four, was 19 and had been feral but was the most gentle creature I’ve ever known, and Stanley, the last loss of the four, was with me for 21 years and came to me as an adult, so he had to be 23 or older, and part of their gift in this was to give me a perspective on my feelings about living with animals through those long, complex relationships.

Then just a few months after Stanley, Lucy, the rescue kitten I’d decided to keep, was diagnosed with effusive FIP at the age of one year, and I lost her three months later, learning the lesson of loss in a relationship in the full bloom of first love.

My Namir was diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure just before all this began, and I lost him in July 2009 after all the others and after four years of caregiving. I had known that his time was limited, and his loss was kind of an ending point for that cycle.

Each time I’d lost a cat, I designed a card dedicated to them and sent it out to friends as a part of my grieving process—I’m an artist, and creating is how I work through everything from joy to sorrow. I also received a number of sympathy cards from friends and saw that not much was available for the loss of an animal companion. Even in their passing they are teachers, and with Namir’s loss I knew the time was right. I pulled together all the photos and some of the art I’d been visualizing, wrote the text from my heart remembering the most comforting things I had heard and thought and said to others in their losses, and put all the cards together. I could hardly work fast enough to keep up with my thoughts.

What is the creative process like for you?  Do you paint from live models, memory, or photographs?

I actually work in all three ways to get there, usually a combination of the three in one work I always start from my initial “inspiration” which comes from life, something I’ve seen or experienced, even if the work is not realistic, then if it’s not possible to be able to do the work in that moment, which it usually is not, then I have memory and photographs as reference. In the end I put everything aside and simply intuit the last details that come from my deep, creative self and then I know the painting is finished. All this is true not just for paintings but also writing and photography as well.

Visualization of that finished work is not a conscious act nor is it something I can force, it’s just something that’s always been a part of my consciousness from the time I can remember.

I learned in painting my cats how important this visualization was and that it needs to exist before I can start. I need to see my goal before I start or I don’t know what to do. Not that I can always see it in all its detail, or that I always end up with that initial visualization or force myself to stay with it. I can usually see the medium I’ll use, and this even happened before I knew how to use a medium, like watercolor. All of my images of my own cats were created this way, not just the paintings and sketches but even the block prints and photographs—I saw that beautiful moment that I wanted to share and in that moment saw the finished work. Then I set about enjoying my path to that end. I then applied this to all the other work I do and I’ve found it’s how I instill a part of myself in each one.

Tell us a little about your feline family members.

Oh, my, I don’t know where to begin! I live with nine wonderful cats right now, and I’ve always lived with seven to nine in my household. I’ve rescued and fostered for almost 30 years, and my household has evolved; everyone was a member unless they were adopted out. While I actively took in cats, I’ve never really consciously adopted a cat. I let the universe decide who was to stay and share my life more permanently. You can read many stories from the past by visiting “My Cats” on my website.

Thank you for stopping by The Conscious Cat, Bernadette!

Be sure to visit Bernadette’s websites at http://www.bernadette-k.com/ and http://portraitsofanimals.wordpress.com/ and look around – it’s like visiting an art gallery.