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Giveaway: Ultimate Peacemaker from Spirit Essences

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I’ve been using Spirit Essences successfully for several years, both for my own cats and for my clients’ cats, with results that sometimes seem to be almost miraculous. This line of remedies was formulated by Dr. Jean Hofve, a holistic veterinarian with more than a dozen years’ experience working with essences, and Jackson Galaxy, who helped develop and refine the remedies based on his decades of working with cats. The remedies are constantly updated and refined, incorporating Jackson’s experiences as he uses them in his work.Continue Reading

Fear-Free Veterinary Visits for Your Cat

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“Fear is the worst thing a social species can experience.” This is how Dr. Marty Becker opened a presentation on his Fear-Free™ Initiative which I attended at the Central Veterinary Conference in Washington DC last month. Dr. Becker’s initiative is part of a growing and long overdue trend in the veterinary profession to minimize the fear and anxiety associated with veterinary visits for both pets and their guardians.

The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) was the first major veterinary organization to recognize the need for this movementContinue Reading

Primal Pet Food Recalls Single Batch of Feline Turkey Raw Frozen Formula

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Primal Pet Foods is recalling a single batch production code of Feline Turkey Raw Frozen Formula 3-pound bag. The FDA tested product in response to a single consumer complaint. Primal Pet Foods was alerted by FDA that the testing of two bags of this lot resulted in a low thiamine (vitamin B) level. Neither the FDA nor Primal have received any other reports concerning thiamine in Primal products. No other product manufactured by Primal Pet Foods is involved in this recall.Continue Reading

Giveaway: Spirit Essences Holistic Remedies Ultimate Peacemaker

Ultimate_Peacemaker_Spirit_Essences

I’ve been using Spirit Essences successfully for several years, both for my own cats and for my clients’ cats, with results that sometimes seem to be almost miraculous.

Spirit Essences are the first and only line formulated by a holistic veterinarian and an animal behaviorist. The company was founded in 1995 by Dr. Jean Hofve, a holistic veterinarian with more than a dozen years’ experience working with essences in a wide variety of species and settings, and Jackson Galaxy, who helped develop and refine the remedies based on his decades of working with cats. The remedies are constantly updated and refined, incorporating Jackson’s experiences as he uses them in his work.Continue Reading

Why Your Cat Needs Environmental Enrichment

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Environmental enrichment is a term that is used by many feline behaviorist, and it’s important that you understand what it means for your cats.

Creating an environment that stimulates your cats’ senses and gives her opportunities to exercise her natural instincts is especially important for indoor cats. Renowned behaviorist Jackson Galaxy, host of Animal Planet’s “My Cat From Hell,” calls environmental enrichment “catification.” Catifying your cat’s environment not only makes her happy, it can also prevent serious behavior problems ranging from scratching and inappropriate elimination to aggression toward other cats in the household.Continue Reading

5 New Year’s Resolutions for Happy, Healthy Cats

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Most New Year’s resolutions are abandoned within a month of making them. There are a lot of reasons why this happens. They may be too much of a stretch, there may be a lack of commitment, or the timing isn’t right. And yet, the New Year is a good time to start fresh and create some healthy habits. The following five resolutions will keep your cats happy and healthy not just for a few weeks, but for the rest of their lives.Continue Reading

Reducing Stress for Cats in a Boarding Facility

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This article was originally published in Pet Boarding and Daycare Magazine. While the article was written for operators of cat boarding and grooming establishments, the tips I provided can also help cat guardians in choosing a good boarding facility for cats.

Cats have a reputation for being independent, which often leads people to believe that they’ll do just fine on their own when their guardians have to go away for a few days. As long as someone comes in and leaves fresh food and water, that’s all they need, right? Nothing could be further from the truth. Accidents happen. Cats could stop eating while their guardians are away, or become ill. Cats need more than just food and water to thrive – they need human interaction, and a chance to play.

Generally, there are two options cat owners who have to travel: having a friend, neighbor or professional pet sitter come to the house, or boarding the cat at a boarding facility. Since cats dislike change, boarding can be a stressful experience. Boarding facilities who wish to attract cat owners need to be aware of cats’ unique needs, and take measures to reduce stress for their feline guests.

Select a boarding facility designed for cats

Providing a low-stress environment for cats starts with the selection of the actual boarding kennel. When Elizabeth Colleran, DVM, designed the boarding section of her cat clinics in Chico, CA and Portland, OR, she made sure that all design decision and selections were made with cats’ needs in mind. “We have a large boarding room with sleeping benches in each enclosure, and a view of the garden from the back of each enclosure,” says Colleran.

Cat kennels or condos should be spacious enough to accommodate separate areas for the cat’s litter box, food, and lounging areas. In order to minimize noise as well as stress, cat boarding areas should be separate from dog boarding kennels. Most cats will find the sound of barking dogs distressing. Cat boarding areas should also be kept away from the main traffic flow of the facility. Cats should not be able to see other cats from their cage or condo. Since cats are territorial animals, the sight of another cat can be stressful and cause aggression toward kennel staff and other cats in the facility.

Environmental enrichment features

Enriching the kennel with features such as resting boards, cardboard hiding boxes, bedding and toys can go a long way toward making cats more comfortable. Offering a view of the outside can be an added bonus: “Bird TV” can keep cats entertained during the day. Playing soft music throughout the day can provide a “white noise” effect. Studies have shown that classical music, or music specifically designed to calm pets, can have beneficial effects on cats’ stress levels.

Pheromone sprays and plug ins can help reduce anxiety in kennel areas. Cages and bedding should be sprayed every day. The use of pheromone plug ins in all areas of the kennel where cats will be housed can help keep feline boarders calm. Holistic remedies such as Rescue Remedy or Spirit Essences Stress Stopper can be beneficial as well.

Common social areas – yes or no?

If a boarding facility provides common social areas for cats, it is critical to only allow cats from the same family into the area at the same time, and only if prior approval is obtained from the cat’s owner. Common areas, as well as individual cages, need to be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected between cats to minimize the potential for exposure to spread illness Even seemingly healthy cats can be carriers of feline viruses without exhibiting signs of disease. “There is a balance between cleanliness/disinfection and the elaborateness of the enclosures and common areas,” says Dr. Colleran. “I chose to keep them very simple so that we would never have a problem with viruses.”

Give cats time to acclimate

A boarding facility can be frightening for cats, especially those who have not been away from home before. Cats will need time to acclimate to a new environment. Most cats will adjust with two or three days. They may not eat much during the adjustment period, and it is critical that food intake is monitored closely. A cat who doesn’t eat for more than 24-48 hours is at risk for hepatic lipidosis, a potentially life-threatening condition.

Staff needs to be trained in proper handling of cats

Staff should be trained in proper handling of cats and in how to read a cat’s body language to avoid inadvertently stressing cats. “We watch for the behaviors we know indicate that cats are settling in,” explains Dr. Colleran, “especially how soon they eat, where they sit in the enclosure and how willing they are to curl up and sleep.”
Cats are highly sensitive to energy. A study conducted at the Ohio State University School of Veterinary Medicine demonstrated a connection between stress and illness in cats. Researchers found that they had to manage their own stress levels when they were around the cats. “I had to be careful if I was having a bad day so it didn’t rub off on the cats,” says Judi Stella, PhD, a post-doctoral researcher at Purdue University, who participated in the study. Staff should approach cats slowly and speak in soft voices. They should understand that forcing human contact does not accelerate a cat’s acclimation period. Cats need to be allowed to relax at their own pace.

Personal belongings with the scent of home

Allow cat owners to bring their cat’s personal belongings. “We invite people to bring familiar bedding and familiar toys, food or treats,” says Dr. Colleran. A blanket, article of clothing with the owner’s scent on it or a favorite toy may go a long way toward making a cat feel more secure.

Web cameras

Consider installing web cameras in cat boarding areas so clients can monitor their cats while they’re away. Webcams are easy to set up and allow cat owners to watch live streaming video of their feline family members on the boarding facility’s website. Most pet parents love being able to see their cat while they’re away from. “The web cams give me the opportunity to check on my cat Smoky 24/7,’ says Maureen Carnevale, who boards her cat at Olde Town Pet Resort in Springfield, VA. “Additionally, I can also observe the staff and the care Smoky receives in my absence. This gives me a lot of comfort and peace of mind.”

Boarding facilities can greatly reduce stress for their feline clients by keeping cats’ unique needs in mind during facility design and when developing operating procedures.

Photo by Rocky Mountain Cat Rescue, Flickr Creative Commons

How to Keep Your Indoor Cat Happy

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There’s no question that indoor cats live longer, healthier lives. It is imperative that cat guardians provide a stimulating environment for indoor cats. Cat behaviorist Jackson Galaxy has coined the term “catification,” which means creating a cat-friendly environment that provides outlets for a cat’s natural instincts to hunt, catch, kill and eat his prey, followed by grooming and sleeping.Continue Reading

Five Pillars of a Healthy Feline Environment

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At their core, cats are still wild animals, and while we’ve invited them into our homes to share our lives, we can’t expect them to completely give up all their instincts. We have to look at our living space from the cat’s point of view and provide an environment that keeps them stimulated. Feline behavior experts agree. Jackson Galaxy introduced the concept of catification on his hit show My Cat From Hell. Catifying your environment means providing a space for your cats where they can exercise their natural instincts in the safety of our homes.

The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) introduced the five pillars of a healthy feline environmentContinue Reading

Why Do Cats Groom Each Other?

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It’s one of the sweetest behaviors guardians of multiple cats can witness: two adult cats grooming each other. Have you ever wondered why some cats do that, and others don’t?

The scientific term for this behavior is allogrooming or social grooming. A 1998 study conducted by researchers at the University of Southampton, UK and the University of Leiden, Netherlands, analyzed grooming interactions among a group of 83 domestic cats. The study shed some interesting light on this behavior.Continue Reading