The Ins and Outs of Feline Periodontal Disease

feline-periodontal-disease-guideThis post contains affiliate links*

By the time they reach three years of age, about 80% of cats have oral health issues, with many showing the tell-tale signs of early onset periodontal disease.

Unfortunately, periodontal disease often goes untreated, because other than a foul smelling breath  —something that many cat parents just write off as “bad breath”—there are few other symptoms of the disease during its early stages. Periodontal disease can lead to multiple problems for your cat, including pain and, eventually, tooth loss.

Our friends at 1TDC™ have put together a fantastic guide, written by a a board-certified veterinary dentist. The guide addresses periodontal disease in depth, and will answer these questions and  much much more:

  • What is feline periodontal disease?
  • What are the warning signs of periodontal disease?
  • How can you prevent your cat from developing periodontal disease?
  • What role does diet play in feline dental and oral health?
  • What dental conditions should I look for in my cat?

The guide is free and available for immediate download.

Click here to download
7 Reasons Your Cat’s Oral Health Should be Top of  Mind

What is 1TDC™?

1TDC™ (which stands for 1-TetraDecanol Complex) is a revolutionary natural solution that keeps joints, muscles and gums healthy at a cellular level. This product goes beyond supplements containing glucosamine and fish oil. It works systemically as a catalyst to allow the body to improve joint and oral health.

1TDC™ is a proprietary blend of fatty acids that are derived from beef tallow. They are then formulated into a unique fatty acid complex in a CGMP (Current Good Manufacturing Practice regulations enforced by the FDA) food-grade facility in the USA. These fatty acids are different from the essential acids you find in products like fish oil.

1TDC™’s unique technology is highly and rapidly absorbed, whether applied topically on the gums or taken orally in capsule form. When it enters the body, 1TDC™ has a tremendous affinity for white blood cells, which allows it to get where it is needed quickly. 1TDC™ efficiently does the job without interfering with other elements of your cat’s health.

1TDC-capsule

Study shows 1TDC™ reduces periodontal disease within six weeks

A study performed at the University of Saskatchewan, Canada, showed that daily use of 1TDC™over a period of six weeks resulted in significant improvements in cats with periodontal disease. There were 13 cats in the study. 9 cats received a daily administration of 1TDC™, the other 4 cats received olive oil for six weeks. The cats who received 1TDC™ showed significant reductions in all parameters of clinical periodontal disease except tooth mobility at 6 weeks. The cats showed a statistically significant reduction in pocket depth, clinical attachment loss, gingival index and bleeding on probing, whereas the placebo group did not show any significant change.

To full study was published in the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery.

1TDC-benefits-cat

1TDC reduced Allegra’s gingivitis

I don’t use the term “miracle” lightly, but I consider this product a miracle supplement. Even before I started using it for Allegra, the research convinced me. And now, I get to see the benefits first hand: at Allegra’s most recent check up, our vet found that her gums looked better than last year and that there is less evidence of gingivitis.

For more information about 1TDC™ and to purchase, please visit 1TDC.com.

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4 Comments on The Ins and Outs of Feline Periodontal Disease

  1. Kate M
    July 30, 2020 at 10:08 am (1 week ago)

    I was surprised to read the much debunked “kibble can help clean your cat’s teeth” in a pamphlet that you recommended – I feel like that goes against a core tenet of this site?

    Reply
    • Sheila Cvetic
      August 2, 2020 at 7:19 am (1 week ago)

      My 7 yr old male tabby had FORLS & stomatitis, he had to have a full mouth
      extraction, so he has no teeth now, but
      he leads a normal life & no more meds
      & pain. Look it up as it’s quite common.

      Reply
  2. Lee
    July 27, 2020 at 1:39 pm (2 weeks ago)

    My cat just had a dental and I’m going to look into this as a way to maintain his no-longer-irritated gums!

    Reply
  3. Janine
    July 27, 2020 at 7:45 am (2 weeks ago)

    I have never heard of this. Thanks for the head’s up.

    Reply

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