Introducing a Kitten to Your Older Cat

 cat_meets_kitten

Guest post by Jackie Roberts

Finding a companion for an older cat requires some forethought, and is frequently not quite as simple as finding an adorable kitten at the local shelter, bringing her home, and introducing her immediately to the older resident cat. Kittens may not be a good match for many senior cats, especially cats who are dealing with health issues. If, after careful thought, you decide to have a kitten join your older feline in residence, slow and steady introductions will ensure a smooth experience for everyone.

Beyond the unsure nature of socialization between cat and kitten, there are also potential health concerns with an immediate introduction. When taking a new kitten home, the first stop should be a veterinarian’s office to make sure he is feline leukemia and FIV negative, free of parasites, and otherwise in good health.

The following tips will help you introduce your new kitten to your older cat.

Age Matters

A kitten and an older cat aren’t necessarily going to play together even after they’ve been introduced. The two are at different life stages, and the older resident may not have the same energy levels as the younger, or the same personality. If you are looking for a playmate for your older cat, aim for an animal that is the same age or temperament of the current feline. If you still want a kitten, consider getting another kitten at the same time so the two younger animals can entertain each other.

Safe Room

The best way to introduce a new kitten is to create a “safe room” as a way to get her used to the smells and sounds of her new home without getting overwhelmed. The ideal safe room will have a separate litter box, food and water bowls, a bed, a scratching post, a few toys and possibly a place to hide, as well as a door that closes firmly. The kitten will have everything that she needs in one cozy, familiar space, and won’t have to face the vast openness of a single family home or apartment yet.

Scent Friendly

Creating this safe room allows the two cats to meet each other indirectly by sniffing each other through the closed door. Promote this indirect interaction slowly but steadily and monitor the effects for any negative reactions on either side.

With the new kitten still in the “safe room,” numerous methods can be used to get the two together in a positive atmosphere. Older animals can be quite territorial, and it is possible that the resident may take a few days to be within sniffing distance of this intruder, even for eating. Don’t force the situation if your older feline is reluctant to be introduced; let it progress naturally.

After a few days, you can try feeding the two cats on opposite sides of the safe room door so that they associate each other’s presence with a positive experience. You can also exchange scents by sharing combs or washcloths or even swapping spaces (while the other is not present) to get the animals used to each other.

First Impressions

Once the two are comfortable with each other’s scent, it’s time for a face-to-face meeting. The first face-to-face interaction is often cautious sniffing and posturing. Don’t give up at this point. Let the animals retreat to their own spaces and come back when they’re ready to.

Introducing a young kitten to an older cat does not always go as expected. Many older cats have never been around kittens before and often can be quite afraid of them. Don’t expect the “parenting gene” to kick in if your elder cat has not been around kittens.

If there is more going on  than just sniffing and posturing, carefully separate the two to their respective areas of the house. Try the process again later, and go slower if necessary.

Introducing a kitten to an older cat is not always easy, but it can be rewarding if you go slow, and allow the two cats to get used to each other.

Jackie Roberts is a writer for 1-800-PetMeds, and loves to help and support the pet community. You can find Pet Meds on Twitter or connect with Pet Meds on Facebook.

Photo ©Dan Powers, courtesy of Zee & Zoey’s Chronicle Connection

64 Comments on Introducing a Kitten to Your Older Cat

  1. Kuri
    March 20, 2017 at 9:22 am (1 month ago)

    Hi all, I currently have a 5 year old male neutered cat who has always been weird. He’s pretty social with people as in he doesn’t hide with visitors (he actually likes hanging around people) although he doesn’t like to be pet or picked (he tolerates maybe a few seconds but after that he gets angry). He has always been weird with my mom though, like aggressive and tries to attack her, when I’m around he doesn’t do that. A friend of mine had kittens and since we’re pretty much a cat family decided to adopt him. We’ve had said kitten (8 weeks old male) for 3 days but my mom keeps saying we can’t have the kitten isolated for a few weeks because it’s -and I quote- “unnatural”. How likely is it that if I let them meet the older cat is going to attack the kitten? I’m worried because I don’t want a bloodbath and there’s no way a kitten is gonna be able to defend against a huge cat like mine (he is very big). Please help what should I do?

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      March 20, 2017 at 1:06 pm (1 month ago)

      You have to keep the kitten isolated and introduce him slowly. It is extremely likely that your older cat will attack the kitten if the kitten is not introduced slowly and gradually. If anything, it’s “unnatural” to expect cats who have never met to get along without a slow introduction. They’re territorial animals.

      Reply
  2. Mariana
    March 20, 2017 at 12:02 am (1 month ago)

    I currently have a 9 month old male kitten, we were given a 2 year old female cat in a pet carrier upon her arrival she started growling and hissing my male kitten started to become more vocal than he usually is, he wasn’t growling or hissing. When he was in the room so we could do a proper introduction the female cat started hissing at us. I don’t know if she’s scared of the place over all and she’s being defensive or if she’s just not a good fit for us. We’re dabating whether to keep trying to make it work or just give up and give her back. Someone please help!

    Reply
  3. Alexis
    February 19, 2017 at 7:33 pm (2 months ago)

    I have a two and a half year old cat, Cosmos, who is a dominant tuxedo cat. Almost a year ago, her twin sister, Pepper, passed away from cancer. Even though Cosmos was dominant (though she is extremely small for her age, and was smaller than Pepper,), she has now gotten very clingy, friendly, and peaceful, whereas when Pepper was alive, she was more independent, active, and less cuddle-loving. I don’t want her to be jealous, but I was thinking about getting a kitten for companionship. I know that a kitten would not be the ideal choice for an almost three year old cat, but everyone in my family wants a kitten, and since we also have a dog, a kitten would learn to tolerate it (the dog) better. What kitten should I get, and how should I treat this situation?

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      February 20, 2017 at 6:17 am (2 months ago)

      If Cosmos was the dominant cat in her relationship with Pepper, she may want to be dominant again with another cat, although that’s impossible to predict. If you decide to get a kitten, make sure you introduce the newcomer very slowly and gradually.

      Reply
      • Alexis
        February 20, 2017 at 1:22 pm (2 months ago)

        Okay, thanks!

        Reply
  4. Joan Burke
    February 8, 2017 at 5:16 pm (3 months ago)

    We have a 10-year-old Norwegian Forest Cat (we think is; he was a stray) that came to our home when he was about one year old. His name is Jack, he is friendly, on his own terms. He is inside/outside. I just got a new male short hari(thought it was a female when I got it) kitten that is very playful, loveable and energetic, about 4 months old, his name is Cookie. He wants to play with Jack and tries to eat his food. Jack is very unhappy with this new situation, and would just go outside all the time if I didn’t put Cookie in his room (he has his own food, water, toys, litter box, etc., in there). I have to do that so Jack can eat and find some peace. Some days Jack will go downstairs to sleep; I then shut the stairway door and the kitten can have the whole upstairs to play. Currently I keep the kitten indoors. They have sniffed noses, then just growled and mewed at each other. The kitten thinks it’s a great game to chase him. Jack just doesn’t want to engage and he is pretty stressed out. He has batted at the kitten but hasn’t really reacted much at all; which surprised me because Jack has been aggressive around other cats in the past. All attempts to make them get along have failed. I will keep them both no matter what, but this situation is hard for me and my husband. I feel like I made a mistake by getting this kitten; but, as I said, this is his home now. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. I love both these kitties very much.

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      February 9, 2017 at 6:20 am (2 months ago)

      Your best bet is probably to start over and do very slow and gradual introductions. The fact that Jack doesn’t react with aggression is a good sign – it sounds more like the kitten’s energy is stressing him out. Go through the intro process step by step, and back up a step if things don’t go well. Additionally, make sure you play with the kitten to the point of exhaustion to help him burn off energy. It may take months for Jack to accept Cookie. Alternately, you may want to consider getting Cookie a playmate his own age and energy level, although there’s no telling whether that will add to Jack’s stress or decrease it.

      Reply
      • Joan Burke
        February 21, 2017 at 1:08 am (2 months ago)

        Thank you so much, Ingrid. I have been taking things very slowly, and it seems to have paid off! Though they are still tumbling around some, Jack is being gentle and Cookie ls less aggressive, and for the first time they are able to be together in the same room without fighting. I am guardedly optimistic that a kitty friendship might be forged. I have been giving Jack lots of attention, and make sure Cookie is in her room when he wants to eat or gets too tired and needs to rest. I am thrilled with the results. I took them both outside today and they behaved so well with each other. Your advice was exactly right! Thanks again.

        Reply
        • Joan Burke
          February 21, 2017 at 1:39 am (2 months ago)

          Correction – *his room – still having trouble with that since I first thought Cookie was a female! And I also meant to say the toys for Cookie really helped, too. He carries them around in his mouth, plays with them a long time and hides them in various places. Very sweet baby kitten. But of course, Jack will always be my first lovey. Now I have him as well as a kitty to snuggle with; Cookie cuddles right up next to me, or in my lap, and conks out! Heaven!

          Reply
          • Ingrid
            February 21, 2017 at 6:17 am (2 months ago)

            I’m so glad things are going well, Joan!

          • Joan Burke
            February 21, 2017 at 4:35 pm (2 months ago)

            Me too! It’s been so helpful to have a solid strategy from you. A calmer cat climate for us all! Yay!

  5. Bec
    January 23, 2017 at 5:01 am (3 months ago)

    Hello,
    My family has an older female cat who is almost 13 years old and has been in two cat fights before, she’s an outside/inside cat and other cats have come into our yard. I want to get a new kitten and I’m wondering how she will go, or whether it will be too much for her. She’s never liked attention and much prefers to be left alone and has never been the type to play with us or sit on anyone’s lap, so my initial thoughts are she may just continue to chill out alone, but I’m not sure. I don’t want her to feel like we don’t want her anymore and I’m worried that a new cat, even though he (the new kitten) is still a baby. Any suggestions would be really appreciated?

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      January 23, 2017 at 6:16 am (3 months ago)

      Based on your description of your cat’s personality, I’m not sure that she’d easily take to another cat in your household. Since she’s an indoor/outdoor cat, I’d be concerned that she would just decide to not come back into the house if you bring in another cat. If you decide to move forward, make sure you introduce the newcomer slowly and gradually.

      Reply
  6. emma
    December 22, 2016 at 4:58 am (4 months ago)

    Hi, I used to have two siamese cats who were friendly but not always. One of the siamese died about a month back and ever since, the other siamese has been very lonely and clingy. My family and I bought two siamese kittens as my other siamese is very playful and we thought it would be a good idea to get them. It’s day two and the older siamese keeps coming into the room where the kittens are and going to them and then hissing at them, will it get any better?

    Reply
  7. Lindsay
    November 28, 2016 at 11:26 pm (5 months ago)

    Thank you for posting!

    I’ve got a bit of a twist, however. I have 2 two-year old cats and I’m trying to integrate a kitten (4 months) and it’s not going well (lots of hissing). The kitten is blind (actually she has no eyes at all) and I don’t think she can pick up on the body language the others are displaying. The kitten will charge right at the other two, freaking them out, because she just doesn’t know they’re there. I backed up a step and am isolating the kitten, but they don’t hiss through the door, and the older cats even seem curious and interested. They stick their paws under the door, however the blind kitten obviously doesn’t see this. I’m also worried about leaving the differently-abled kitten by herself too much. I’m worried she’ll get depressed because at least at the shelter she had a “cage-mate”.

    Any ideas how I can work with this disability? The older cats just seem freaked out by it.

    Reply
  8. Kim
    August 21, 2016 at 9:44 pm (8 months ago)

    Mosie my 10 yr old cat was living with my parents’ 18 yr old cat until that cat passed away recently I was wondering should I get a cat close to Mosie’s age or get one a bit younger ? I know that Mosie and Tiger weren’t exactly buddies but they did tolerate each other. Mosie is active and playful for her age.

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      August 22, 2016 at 5:37 am (8 months ago)

      I think it’s more important to match the new cat in terms of personality rather than age.

      Reply
  9. Lyla and Ava
    June 25, 2016 at 7:49 am (10 months ago)

    Please help. I recently as in today brought home a 7 week kitten that was abandoned. I have a just turned 1 year old female calico. She usually greets us at the door when we come home. She saw the new female kitten and immediately hissed and growled. We didn’t know what to do so we separated the two putting the kitten in the bedroom with food, water, litter box, etc. we are trying to figure out how long before we start introducing them again because our 1 year old is used to sleeping and being albe to roam the entire house but we had to close off the other bedroom where the kitten is. The kitten cries so bad that one of us has to sleep in there with her. Please help

    Reply
  10. Michelle
    May 17, 2016 at 8:36 pm (11 months ago)

    Good evening! I just brought home a 4 week old female kitten. I have a 4 year old female Tabby cat that I love with all my heart. I have the kitten in my bathroom in my room and my Tabby in the living room. But today she is hissing a lot, growling and spitting at me and even trying to attack me! What should I do? I don’t like seeing her so on happy.

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      May 18, 2016 at 5:55 am (11 months ago)

      That’s a pretty extreme reaction, but not unusual. Your Tabby is clearly very unhappy with smelling the new kitten. Try using Feliway plugins and Spirit Essences Stress Stopper or Rescue Remedy to help your Tabby calm down. Don’t even try to attempt introductions until she has calmed down.

      Reply
  11. me
    May 5, 2016 at 12:34 pm (12 months ago)

    Is it alright if I have an older cat with health issues and get a kitten but never introduce them?

    Reply
  12. Alyssa
    April 17, 2016 at 11:52 pm (1 year ago)

    Hi there, we just bought a 16 week old kitten and we have a 3 yr old cat whos been living here since a kitten he is quite territorial wanting his space im a bit worried about them not getting along the kitten is dtaying in a different room at the moment and the two have been sniffing at each other under the door but my older cat is getting quite anxious and hissing and meowing at me when i pick him up now is this because of the new kitten and will they get along?

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      April 18, 2016 at 5:40 am (1 year ago)

      Your older cat is most likely very stressed because of the kitten. I would go very very slowly with introductions. If you’re open to holistic remedies, you may want to consider using Stress Stopper for your older cat: http://bit.ly/stress-stopper

      Reply
  13. Lainee
    February 5, 2016 at 10:30 am (1 year ago)

    We just adopted a 3 month old male kitten (our other amazing cat died a few years ago) this little guy is sweet, affectionate and playful, all things kitten. Question is: a friend just rescued her neighbors cat (he moved, left the cat) and she can’t keep her. She’s about a year old and very friendly and sweet. What are your thoughts introducing an older cat to a new resident kitten? Anyone ever try that? I just feel awful for this l cute little kitty left behind.

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      February 5, 2016 at 10:37 am (1 year ago)

      It sounds like the two cats are a good match personality wise, and at one year old, the abandoned cat is barely an adult herself. Lainee. I would do slow and gradual introductions.

      Reply
      • Lainee
        February 5, 2016 at 2:10 pm (1 year ago)

        That’s what I was thinking…m just worried if it doesn’t go well I won’t know what to do with the older one. Thanks!

        Reply
  14. Andrew
    January 6, 2016 at 4:00 pm (1 year ago)

    Someone at work adopted a stray which had kittens. She is trying desperately to get them homes. I have a 14 yo cat who is very friendly but I worry about bringing in a new cat. Especially one that is younger. My cat was raised in a shelter so has always been around other cats but my last adopted cat was not friendly to him. So I am a bit worried. Any advice?

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      January 6, 2016 at 4:07 pm (1 year ago)

      Kittens aren’t usually a good match for senior cats, but if you decide to give it a try, follow the steps outlined in the article.

      Reply
  15. Tailor
    November 30, 2015 at 12:36 am (1 year ago)

    I have a cat that is 7-month-old born April 17th, and I just got a new kitten about 8 weeks old. And my Grandmother put them together right away and didn’t introduce them slowly so I need help what should I do?

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      November 30, 2015 at 7:12 am (1 year ago)

      If they’re getting along without any fighting, then you got lucky and you can just leave them out together. If they don’t, separate them and start over with slow and gradual introductions.

      Reply
  16. Dominick
    September 7, 2015 at 9:54 pm (2 years ago)

    Hello, I have a cat that’s all most 3 years old he meows alot I’m thanking it’s because he’s lonely. I work some crazy hours sometimes I’m gone for 16 hours out of the day sometime won’t return for a day or two. I need help! Do you think another cat / kitten would be good for him?

    Reply
  17. Lisa
    September 13, 2014 at 9:18 am (3 years ago)

    I have q 12 year old who likes to play and is very active. I brought home a male kitten 2 months ago. I introduced them slowly and she is still growling a hissing at him. She lived very happily with another male for 10 years before he passed away. The kiten wants to be close to her but she wants no part of him. Right now they are separated because if I leave them together all hell breaks loose. He’s going to be neutered next month. Do you think that will help?????? Help !!!!!

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      September 13, 2014 at 5:05 pm (3 years ago)

      Neutering may help, but generally, your best bet is to slow down introductions or to start over and go even slower than you have been.

      Reply
  18. Carmen
    August 1, 2014 at 1:47 pm (3 years ago)

    I have a two year old boy, he is my baby and he is territorial. However, i noticed that he is bored and that he needs company. I saw in the shelter a beautiful female kitten but I’m not sure because she is shy (most because she was just rescue). Do you think this would be a good combination? My cat hides when he doesn’t know the people inside my house and I don’t have children. But at the same time he plays with his toys so he is playful when he is not watching birds. What do you think? or should I get a playful kitten? please help

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      August 1, 2014 at 1:55 pm (3 years ago)

      Unfortunately, there is no way to know for sure whether two cats will get along, Carmen. It may be easier to introduce a kitten to your boy, but you really won’t know for sure until you try it. Your best bet to ensure peace and harmony is doing slow, gradual introductions: http://consciouscat.net/2011/08/15/cat-to-cat-introductions/

      Reply
      • Carmen
        August 1, 2014 at 2:02 pm (3 years ago)

        I took care of a 9 week boy crazy kitten! for 3 weeks. my cat was licking him an playing kick bunnies with him after a short introduction. However, sometimes he was like he need a rest but the kitten keep playing and my cat looks like he was the one who didn’t sleep lol. I had to give back this kitten (i can’t have him back 🙁 , he is not mine) and my cat started to cry that’s why I don’t know if he will be ok with a kitten less playful, the other one was crazyyyyy but adorable at the same time or should I get another one playful?

        Reply
  19. Lisa
    November 10, 2013 at 5:19 pm (3 years ago)

    Made several mistakes along the way.
    Our 13 yr old female, Rella cries and constantly tries to get into the bathroom where she last saw our male cat, he died 3 yrs ago, and they were together since she had been a kitten.

    A yr ago we felt ready to get another cat and ended up with 2, a female and a male, we quickly returned the male as he sprayed all over our house and bullied both females. Our older girl and the new one, Lila seemed to get along fine, but then Lila started attacking the older girl, Rella. This went on for several months and Lila was rather nasty to the human members of the family as well, biting, clawing, etc… We ended up rehoming Lila.
    We thought Rella would be thrilled, but instead she begun crying and trying to get into the bathroom again. Recently she also started pulling out tuffs of her fur. She has been to the vets and is in good health for her age. There have been no changes in the household other than Lila leaving.

    We are hesitate to get another cat. We visited the local SPCA and found a very calm, smaller female 1-2 yrs old, but my children want a little 4 month old male kitten. Male or female? What age? Really don’t know what would be best. Plus I’m afraid a kitten would be too much for my older girl and had heard you should get kittens as a pair.

    Help please!

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      November 11, 2013 at 7:35 am (3 years ago)

      Unfortunately, there’s no way to predict whether two cats will get along, Lisa. Gradual and slow introductions will make it more likely that cats will get along, here’s how: http://consciouscat.net/2011/08/15/cat-to-cat-introductions/

      Generally, a kitten is not the best match for a senior cat. Rella might do better with a laid back, older cat. Since she’s exhibiting symptoms of being stressed by something, it’s hard to know whether a new cat would make things worse or better.

      I wish I had a better answer for you. I would probably start with trying to figure out what is causing Rella’s stress and eliminating that before making any further changes to your household.

      Reply
  20. camo and ammo
    September 1, 2013 at 9:29 am (4 years ago)

    This really is helping me thank you for the advise! I too rushed the first meeting before I read this and now have a safe room for my new kitten. It had been two days and now my older cat is hanging out by the door of the safe room…he is obsessed,is this a good sign? He went after the kitty’s throat a few times and now I am scared he will hurt the new baby…

    Reply
    • camo and ammo
      September 1, 2013 at 9:33 am (4 years ago)

      (my son named them, he is six and loves all things army, but he loves his new kitten more than anything in the world!! I really hope this works!!)

      Reply
      • camo and ammo
        September 1, 2013 at 9:08 pm (4 years ago)

        Just one more question is the base camp allowed to be a bedroom? The older cat is used to sleeping with one of us…but now he can’t because of the “safe room”…is that ok? The only other option would be the bathroom, that just seems too small. I really want this to work, thank you so much for the help!!!

        Reply
        • camo and ammo
          September 1, 2013 at 9:11 pm (4 years ago)

          And thank you again, that last link was awesome!

          Reply
        • Ingrid
          September 2, 2013 at 6:23 am (4 years ago)

          A bedroom is usually a good choice for a safe room, but since your older cat is used to sleeping in the bedroom with you, that’s not the best option for you. A bathroom is not ideal, but if that’s your only other option, I’d try to make that work. Just make sure the new kitten has lots of toys, a scratching post and/or cat tree, and that he gets lots of interaction with you and your family while he’s in the safe room.

          Reply
  21. Patches
    August 30, 2013 at 3:01 pm (4 years ago)

    This is a really good post, however I think I screwed up with my introduction. I have a 3 year old and I just brought in a new kitten two days ago. They have already had some interaction and the older cat is just hissing a growling a lot when the little one meows and such. I keep them separated during the day, but have brought out the little one a few times over the past couple of days. My biggest fear is that I have already set a bad precedence and negative emotion in the older cat that he will not let go of. Have I messed up bad or can I basically “start over” and go back to square one?

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      August 30, 2013 at 4:03 pm (4 years ago)

      I would start over and go back to square one, Patches, and go very very slow. If there are issue, back up a step and go even slower.

      Reply
  22. Smudge
    May 16, 2013 at 7:23 am (4 years ago)

    I have a year old cat and im expecting a 10 week old kitten…Im not sure if 1 year if 1 year is too old for the kitten.I need to know so that I can kind of work things out a little better.

    Reply
  23. Smudge
    May 16, 2013 at 7:21 am (4 years ago)

    I have a year old cat, and expecting a 10 week old kitten…I dont know if 1 year is a little to o old for the new kitten.

    Reply
  24. dobson
    July 15, 2012 at 10:14 pm (5 years ago)

    Great post! Makes a lot of sense when it comes to the age difference. We have a lot of visiting cats, and sometimes the get along with the kitten and sometimes they make it clear that they will NOT be playing today. Of course, outdoor visiting cats is a different scenario than cats that have to live with each other. They’re so much like people with they’re different personalities and motives 🙂

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      July 16, 2012 at 6:19 am (5 years ago)

      Personality definitely plays into it, too, Dobson.

      Reply
  25. Bernadette
    July 11, 2012 at 2:11 pm (5 years ago)

    I always take it slowly with kittens, partly because I’ve had more than five cats, sometimes well more, for decades, and one more cat of any age is a disturbance. And then with kitten energy, we all need a break! It’s usually worked out pretty well, though.

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      July 11, 2012 at 7:32 pm (5 years ago)

      Kitten energy can be a bit overwhelming, Bernadette – in the best possible way.

      Reply
  26. Lianimal
    July 10, 2012 at 6:27 pm (5 years ago)

    GREAT post. Thank goodness my little foundling worked out perfectly, but only because my Senior just wanted to be left alone, and my almost adult was harrassing her. The kitten solved my problem…she gave the almost kitten someone to play with, which caused my senior to be left alone. Lucky me!

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      July 10, 2012 at 8:10 pm (5 years ago)

      Thanks, Lynn. Things really worked out perfectly in your family!

      Reply
  27. Deb Barnes - Zee and Zoey
    July 10, 2012 at 8:13 am (5 years ago)

    Excellent post with great tips. I have had to introduce kittens to cats at various times in my life and it always takes time and patience. Bringing a kitten to a vet for a check up is critical too – one of my kittens that I adopted ended up having a serious eye infection that was highly contagious – he had to be in quarantine for several weeks before he could meet the other cats in the house.

    Age is also so important to consider. The above picture is of my beloved Maine Coon, Zee, and my Bengal, Zoey (their official first meeting). I had wanted Zoey for the longest time, but we had an elder cat that was failing in health. I waited until she passed over the Bridge to get Zoey, as it would have been very unfair to her peace of mind to have a new kitten in the house to deal with.

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      July 10, 2012 at 1:53 pm (5 years ago)

      Thank you for allowing me to use your wonderful photo, Deb!

      Reply
  28. Anna
    July 10, 2012 at 7:33 am (5 years ago)

    Great post! Thanks for sharing!
    It made me think about my Mom’s Theo and his “sister” Lilli, who didn’t like him at all when he joined the household as a kitten… but now they love eachother and are often snuggling up in the same basket! Tommi (Lilli’s brother) was just a little cautious and suspicious at the beginning, but he ended up loving Theo too! They are a happy little family now!!!

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      July 10, 2012 at 1:52 pm (5 years ago)

      That’s so wonderful that Theo and Lilli are now getting along so well, Anna!

      Reply

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