Stomatitis: Painful for Cats, Frustrating for Guardians and Veterinarians

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Stomatitis is is one of the most painful and frustrating conditions cats can develop. Buckley suffered from this condition; a severe inflammation of the oral cavity in cats in which the affected cat essentially becomes allergic to her own teeth. The outward signs of this condition are red, inflamed, and often ulcerated gums, and this can be very painful for the cat.

Cause

The exact cause of stomatitis is not known. The most commonly held theory is that stomatitis is caused by an abnormal reaction of the immune system. Some cats appear to be hypersensitive to their own plaque, and even small amounts will cause the immune system to mount an exxagerated inflammatory response by sending lymphocytic and plasma cells into the cats’ gums and oral tissues. For this reason, the condition is also referred to as lymphocytic plasmacytic gingivitis stomatitis.

Cats with feline leukemia and/or FIV may be predisposed to stomatitis since their immune systems are already compromised by these respective viruses. Another theory suggest that the calici virus or the Bartonella bacterium may be possible causes. There may also be a genetic predisposition in some breeds.

Symptoms

  • Oral pain, often quite severe. Unfortunately, cats are masters at masking pain, so by the time a cat shows signs of pain, the pain has most likely reached a level that would send a human screaming to the emergency room.
  • Refusal to eat, drooling out of the side of the mouth, holding head at odd angles while eating. These are all signs of pain.
  • Extremely red, swollen, often ulcerated gums.

Diagnosis

Stomatitis is diagnosed by a thorough oral exam. Typically, other dental disease such as gingivitis, resportive lesions or retained tooth roots may also be present. Dental x-rays are crucial for a complete diagnosis. If the cat has never been tested for feline leukemia or FIV, testing should be performed at this time. Oral biopsies should be taken when the cat is anesthesized to confirm the diagnosis and rule out other conditions, such as cancer, that may require different treatment.

Treatment

Treatment of this condition can be very frustrating. The goal is to control the inflammatory response. In many cases, a complete resolution of the problem may never be achieved.

The teeth must first be cleaned of all plaque and tartar accumulation both above and below the gum line. This can be accomplished only under anesthesia. Cats may be given antibiotics and anti-inflammatory steroids; however, they usually only offer short term relief. Eventually, most cats will require extraction of all of their teeth.

This approach sounds daunting to most cat parents, but if it is done by an experienced veterinary dentist, with proper pain control protocols, most cats tolerate the treatment well and recover quickly. Most cats have no problem eating without teeth; in fact, they feel so much better once the inflammation is gone that they may even happily gum dry treats.

Some cats will still need treatment even after complete tooth extraction. Ccyclosporine therapy has shown some moderate success. There are some homeopathic remedies that may work for stomatitis. Work with a veterinarian trained in homeopathy to determine the correct remedy.

A cat with stomatitis will require frequent veterinary visits and treatments over her lifetime. The prognosis for a long-term cure is guarded.

Buckley was initially treated with periodic steroid injections, but eventually had all her teeth extracted. She did well after the treatment, but since she ultimately died because of her heart disease, it’s impossible to tell whether full extraction would have been a longterm cure for her.

Photo of Buckley ©Ingrid King

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45 Comments on Stomatitis: Painful for Cats, Frustrating for Guardians and Veterinarians

  1. Deedee
    August 3, 2017 at 6:25 pm (3 weeks ago)

    Ingrid and wonder why if you know if shelter cats get this more than most cats? I volunteer at a cat shelter and so many cats are diagnosed with stomatitis. Often they don’t discover it until it is severe and they euthanize them. It just breaks my heart. I can’t seem to find anything to tell me if shelter cats perhaps because of stress are more susceptible to this.

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      August 4, 2017 at 5:05 am (3 weeks ago)

      Since we don’t know what causes stomatitis, I would think it would be impossible to determine whether there’s a higher prevalence among shelter cats, Deedee.

      Reply
  2. Mo
    January 27, 2016 at 2:42 pm (2 years ago)

    My little girl Scarlett has this. I was bringing her into the vets once a month for shots, then we tried laser treatments that seemed to have helped other cats but not Scarlett. I hated pumping her full of drugs every month and then after a couple of weeks, the drooling started again which meant she was in pain. I finally had most of her teeth pulled – the only ones she has left are her tiny front teeth and her canines. She had them pulled a week ago and she seems fine and is eating her wet food with no problem. Only time will tell how she gets along but I am keeping my fingers crossed. The vet quoted me $700 – $800 cost for these extractions. It came to $600 but if she is pain free – totally worth it – especially since the monthly visits would eventually cost that much and more.

    Reply
    • mal
      February 24, 2017 at 12:58 am (6 months ago)

      How is she now? Did the op work?

      Reply
  3. Q
    November 4, 2015 at 7:08 pm (2 years ago)

    I believe my cat Beatrix has this. Although the vet said it was gingivitis, it doesn’t seem to have helped her at all. We had almost all her teeth removed and gave her all the injections required afterwards. But her gums are still inflamed and she drools a bit. Her breath doesn’t smell anymore but I know she is still uncomfortable and it upsets me that I can’t seem to help her. She refuses to eat wet cat food and still insists on eating hard foods, although I am worried it is making her case worse. I am sorry about Buckley 🙁

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      November 5, 2015 at 6:50 am (2 years ago)

      It’s such a frustrating condition to treat. You mention that you had almost all her teeth removed – you may need to remove the remaining teeth, it might make a difference. If you’re not already working with a veterinary dental specialist, I highly recommend finding one near you to take a look at her. All my best to both of you.

      Reply
    • v
      November 24, 2015 at 12:15 am (2 years ago)

      Q, so sorry to hear that. I have a 16 y o male that likely has lymphoma, we are not doing any invasive surgery so we do our best to keep him comfortable. He has meds every day. But he also has one bad tooth, he had others pulled many yrs ago but he insists on eating dry food. I was so stressed trying to find food for him, tried wet but only worked for a little while and he would constantly eat our other cats dry food. Then i finally nailed it. Have u tried softening his food a little? Ive tried all sorts of concoctions but the best I’ve found that he likes is mixing some broth or pureed pumpkin with a little water with his dry food to soften it. I switch between the two since he seems to like that better and he no longer tries to eat our other cats dry food and he looks much more comfortable when eating! My vet said added benefit is that the pumpkin has enough fiber to help with hairball control!

      Reply
      • Q
        November 24, 2015 at 9:04 am (2 years ago)

        Thank you for the advice, Susan! I will definitely give that a try! The pumpkin sounds like a fantastic idea. I am glad that your boy has become more comfortable with his eating. 🙂

        Reply
  4. Susan
    September 18, 2015 at 11:29 pm (2 years ago)

    Apparently Mozaic (I adopted her June 23) has stomatitis. She definitely smelled bad (her breath), and had red gums. I took her to a new vet, because my regular vet wanted $600 for dental cleaning up to $1300 with extractions. I paid $600 and she had 14 of her back teeth pulled, and not yet even 3 years old.

    How is this diagnosed? The new vet took one very brief (a few seconds) look into her mouth and told me that is what it was. They took xrays before and after, and showed me them, but they are very difficult for a layperson to see anything from them. She did leave her canines (she said there is no redness there.) She told me the teeth had to go.

    I am pretty sure the rescue had to know she had this and even though I asked very pointed questions about her health in general and her dental condition, they never let on and got very defensive. They however sent her home with arm and hammer pet tooth swabs. (which were useless to treat this condition.)

    Time will tell if pulling the teeth will end this condtion for her or not. No one seems to know how they get it or which ones will continue to be plagued after extractions. By the way, she had no symptoms when eating, did not seem to be in any pain or discomfort. It was just the smell and the redness. But I am sure it would have gotten worse.

    I have been reading about success with plaque off and lysine being used together. Can you offer any input on these?

    I have also been considering some others if needed after giving it time to see if she needs further treatment. I was reading about benefits of: vitamin b complex mixed into food, probiotics (which I know you support), vitamin e (rubbed on the gums), vitamin a for gum inflammation, zinc for inflamed red sore gums and co-enzyme q10 (an anti-oxidant developed in japan used for healing mucous membranes and it supposedly has a real affinity for the gums of cats)

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      September 19, 2015 at 5:56 am (2 years ago)

      I’m sorry Mozart has stomatitis, Susan. It is typically diagnosed through an oral exam – the presentation (red, inflamed, often ulcerated gums) is usually fairly obvious. Other causes of oral inflammation should be ruled out, especially the more common gingivitis and periodontitis, which can closely resemble stomatitis. Complete blood work to rule out a any systemic diseases, as well as FeLV and FIV tests (if they haven’t been done prior) should also be done. Most vets recommend doing a biopsy to rule out eosinophilic granuloma complex, fungal disease, or squamous cell carcinoma.

      Full mouth extraction is the only known treatment to alleviate this condition. It’s highly likely that Mozart’s canines will eventually have to be removed as well. I have not heard of using Plaque Off (a product I’m not familiar with, and looking at the website, it’s not clear to me how it actually works) and lysine used together. Anything that will boost the cat’s immune system can help, since stomatitis is believed to be an autoimmune disease, so anti-oxidants, CO Q 10 and probiotics may all have some benefit.

      All my best to Mozart. I think you’ll be surprised how much of a difference extracting the teeth will make.

      Reply
      • susan
        September 20, 2015 at 12:20 am (2 years ago)

        Thanks Ingrid.

        Mozaic goes back to the vet Tuesday for her one week checkup post extractions. I know I do not smell her breath any more like I did since I adopted her.

        She has shown no signs of discomfort since having them pulled, but showed none before they were pulled either.

        I have read lots of comments from owners of cats with stomatitis and they have had real success with the combo of l-lysine and plaque off, so I may pick some up in case.

        Do I understand correctly that there is no harm in giving both my cats lysine daily indefinitely? (Topaz has early kidney disease.)

        Is it safe to give Mozaic several of those things you mentioned in your reply without harm? (anti-oxidants, CO Q 10 and probiotics)

        By the way she tested negative for fiv and felv when I adopted her at her wellness exam and she had bloodwork post op as well which indicated nothing amiss. No biopsy was done.

        Reply
        • Ingrid
          September 20, 2015 at 5:49 am (2 years ago)

          Adverse reactions to L-Lysine are highly unlikely. Check with your vet on whether it’s indicated for a cat in early stage kidney failure. All of the supplements should be safe to give, but when in doubt, always check with your vet. I’d add them in one at a time over a period of a few weeks, that way, if there are any problems, you’ll be able to figure out which of the supplements is causing them.

          Reply
  5. susan
    September 18, 2015 at 6:18 pm (2 years ago)

    Apparently Mozaic (I adopted her June 23) has stomatitis. She definitely smelled bad (her breath), and had red gums. I took her to a new vet, because my regular vet wanted $600 for dental cleaning up to $1300 with extractions. I paid $600 and she had 14 of her back teeth pulled, and not yet even 3 years old.

    How is this diagnosed? The new vet took one very brief (a few seconds) look into her mouth and told me that is what it was. They took xrays before and after, and showed me them, but they are very difficult for a layperson to see anything from them. She did leave her canines (she said there is no redness there.) She told me the teeth had to go.

    I am pretty sure the rescue had to know she had this and even though I asked very pointed questions about her health in general and her dental condition, they never let on and got very defensive. They however sent her home with arm and hammer pet tooth swabs. (which were useless to treat this condition.)

    Time will tell if pulling the teeth will end this condtion for her or not. No one seems to know how they get it or which ones will continue to be plagued after extractions. By the way, she had no symptoms when eating, did not seem to be in any pain or discomfort. It was just the smell and the redness. But I am sure it would have gotten worse.

    I have been reading about success with plaque off and lysine being used together. Can you offer any input on these?

    I have also been considering some others if needed after giving it time to see if she needs further treatment. I was reading about benefits of: vitamin b complex mixed into food, probiotics (which I know you support), vitamin e (rubbed on the gums), vitamin a for gum inflammation, zinc for inflamed red sore gums and co-enzyme q10 (an anti-oxidant developed in japan used for healing mucous membranes and it supposedly has a real affinity for the gums of cats)

    Reply
  6. Narelle
    June 24, 2015 at 8:42 am (2 years ago)

    Thanks Sue

    We have him in reasonable health now we have had him for nearly 10 months – we had all his teeth removed about 6 months ago but it did not help the Stomatitis around the arches as his was a chronic case – I still think removing the teeth was good as it stopped all the drooling and pain and inflammation around the teeth, but if I did it again I would leave
    the front teeth as this area took ages to heal and was very painful. Our vet did a full extraction for another cat on the same day as Boris and his Stomatitis fully resolved which was a great result for that kitty so each case is different.

    We are treating him with 5mg Pred every second day and Tramadol transdermal gel on his ear – he has his ups and downs where I have to hand feed him by dropping the food into his mouth like feeding a seal but all in all he is doing well – thanks very much for your reply.

    Cheers Narelle

    Reply
  7. Timothy
    May 15, 2014 at 11:17 pm (3 years ago)

    My 3 year old cat just got to see the vet and I found out she has this, I have been taking car of her as my own child from the age of 3 days when I found her. needless to say she is more than worth any price I have to pay to get her taken care of, extracting all her teeth would break my heart but at least she wouldnt be in any more pain, she has a very healthy appetite and only makes a bit of “it hurt” meows when she yawns heavy, so I hope extracting them all doesnt have to happen.

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      May 16, 2014 at 5:37 am (3 years ago)

      All my best to your kitty, Timothy. I know full mouth extraction sounds daunting, but it does seem to help many cats. I’ve recently heard about someone having success with laser treatments for stomatitis, so you may want to look into that as well. I also found one report of a cat who was successful treated with stem cell therapy: http://consciouscat.net/2014/04/14/stem-cell-therapy-helps-cat-stomatitis/

      Reply
  8. Teresa
    May 15, 2014 at 12:38 am (3 years ago)

    I have 3 cats. My girls will be 6 end of this month and my boy is 3. I adopted my girls at 3 months old from a shelter that rescued them at 6 weeks of age after their feral Mom was killed by a car…
    My 1 girl (they are brown tabby’s) was diagnosed at 18 months with stomatitis and confirmed via mouth biopsy. She and her sister both tested negative for leukemia and FIV on 2 tests (one as kittens prior to my adopting them and another at about 1 year of age). We live in Canada and knowledge is limited. We did a long course of steroids and this past October tapered them off and started Metacam.
    I need to admit I am not 100% convinced total tooth extraction will cure my girl’s issues.
    She doesn’t cry when she eats, her gums are quite red, she drools on occasion…
    She goes annually for dental cleaning and eats grain free foods…
    At 3 I discovered (after almost 9 months) she is allergic to fish…
    Now I think she has a chicken allergy so we have moved to a limited ingredient diet turkey, rabbit, duck (none of them like lamb or venison)…not a lot of soft foods don’t have some form of chicken…
    End of this month I am taking her to another vet for a second opinion, this vet also happens to been a holistic vet too…
    I admit if she recommends tooth extraction then that’s what we will do…My cat’s vet is letting me take the lead on this and she already has a good dental vet in mind.
    I am so frustrated with all my girlie has gone through…and what she is going through…as you are all aware with your kitties….
    And much as I try she will not let me brush her teeth…and we are also trying raw food in small amounts but no one here seems to be interested…
    I have heard L-lysine is a good food additive and I plan to ask this holisitic vet about that…
    Oh my cats are strictly indoor, all are fixed and all are vaccinated even though the vaccines may also be worsening the inflammation…another topic for the new vet…
    I don’t want her to remain on the metacam and end up shutting her kidneys down…I am a nurse and I know what that does to people…she is such a loving good natured well tempered girl…
    I long for anything people have done that has helped…

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      May 15, 2014 at 5:43 am (3 years ago)

      Stomatitis is such a frustrating condition, and it is so painful for the affected cats. Since cats mask pain so well, many continue to eat even though their mouths are painful. There has been some success with stem cell therapy for stomatitis: http://consciouscat.net/2014/04/14/stem-cell-therapy-helps-cat-stomatitis/ I also recently heard that laser treatments may help. All my best to you and your girl!

      Reply
    • Narelle
      January 12, 2015 at 3:10 pm (3 years ago)

      Hi Teresa

      Sorry to hear about your kittys problem – we have had lots of ups and downs with this same issue ourselves – we have two healthy cats with no issues so far and we rescued a cat with Stomatitis and FIV 4 months ago – not sure of his age – on vets advice we had all his teeth removed two months ago – his was a very bad and chronic case and it has taken him the full two months to heal from the removal of his teeth – unfortunately, this has not yet cured the stomatitis – it’s less red and he now no longer drools and his mouth no longer smells bad which is at least a positive. If I had it to do again I would leave in his canines as it took ages for the wounds in that area to heal.We are keeping him comfortable on 5mg per day of Prednosolone and a low dose of Tramadol Transdermal cream which we put on his ear – this was prescribed by our vet and made up at a compounding chemist – it’s very hard to give Tramadol in their food as it is very bitter- it works out at around 12 cents a dose for the Tram which is pretty good!! He is happy and purry and eating well as long as we keep him on both meds – if we drop either one he slides back into not eating and looking very unhappy – I also notice the inflammation gets worse if he eats dry biscuits probably due to the food additives etc so we don’t give him these and keep him on a good diet of wet food.

      I think it’s about keeping them as comfortable as possible on as low dose as you can to get the desired effect – we have come to the conclusion he will be on these meds long term.

      All the best! ( :

      Reply
  9. Makena
    January 17, 2014 at 5:33 pm (4 years ago)

    My poor kitty has this condition and my mom wants to put her down tomorrow any advice? She is only one year old

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      January 17, 2014 at 6:22 pm (4 years ago)

      Stomatitis is not a reason to euthanize a cat, especially not such a young cat! I think you’d be hard pressed to find a vet who would agree to do this.

      Reply
  10. Michelle S
    February 5, 2013 at 1:39 pm (5 years ago)

    Like Sandy, 3 of my cats had stomatitis within a 12 month time frame. They were not related, but two were FIV+. After all I’ve been through, nobody on this earth could convince me that this is not a result of some type of infection, viral or otherwise.

    I did have extractions done on all three boys (all but canines), and the survival time post surgery was 13 months (FIV-), 2 years (FIV+), and 3 months (FIV+, end stage). This was the single most heart wrenching period of my life. They all passed within months of each other in 2012.

    If I were to go through this again, I would consult with a dental specialist that was open to alternative therapies, and avoid steroids all together.

    I found an excellent Stomatitis group on Yahoo that has very valuable resources and information. If anyone wants it, I’ll post the link. Also, cats should be on Prednisolone, not Prednisone.

    Reply
    • Glen
      February 25, 2014 at 11:48 am (3 years ago)

      Please post website of support group for feline stomatitis. Thanks.

      Reply
    • Sheina
      April 28, 2014 at 1:12 am (3 years ago)

      Can you please post the link to the Stomatitis group you found on yahoo? I am very interested and also really need to find some resources to help my 3 year old kitty.

      Reply
    • Pam
      April 30, 2015 at 12:04 pm (2 years ago)

      Could you plz give me the support group on yahoo for cat Stomatitis. I would be so appreciative. Thank you.

      Reply
  11. Sandy
    January 20, 2013 at 2:42 pm (5 years ago)

    We adopted 2 shelter cats both 2 different breeds of siamese, Rascal (snowshoe) and Sammy (sealpoint). The younger of the two Rascal started getting these sores in his mouth, the vet didn’t know what it was and sent us to a specialist. The specialist suggested extraction (very expensive) but we did it. We then adopted another shelter cat(babygirl-calico), after a year she started doing the same thing, and 1 1/2 yrs later .Sammy Kitty is too. We are not having their teeth extracted do to cost. We are monitoring them and blending soft food and giving prednisone for comfort. When this no longer works they will be put down. We did not have good luck with Rascal’s extraction and he is also on prednisone. We were told that this disease is not contagious but I can’t believe that we are just that “lucky” to have all 3 of our babies get this. So frustrating.

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      January 20, 2013 at 7:45 pm (5 years ago)

      I’m so sorry you’re dealing with this in all three of your cats, Sandy.

      Reply
    • Rachel
      May 10, 2014 at 6:39 pm (3 years ago)

      Our lynx-point Siamese was just diagnosed with juvenile onset FS and will have a FME on Tuesday. Much of what I’ve been reading has pointed out a predilection to the Siamese breed. I’d be curious to know if there has been any research on how many cases can be attributed to genetics?

      Reply
      • Ingrid
        May 11, 2014 at 5:23 am (3 years ago)

        I have not seen any research that points to a genetic component for stomatitis, Rachel, but I’ll definitely post about it if I come across something.

        Reply
  12. Clorissa
    June 10, 2012 at 1:05 pm (5 years ago)

    Its the most frustrating…… My cat Scrappy has stomatitis, my husband and I rescued her. She was a kitten about two months or so and scrawny, we found her in our garage. The vet has told us that it will cost around $3000, to fix her, we dont have the funds to help her, I really need help in finding funding. We just had our first baby in January and because of the I-1183 that has passed in Washington my husband is going to loose his job in the next month or so. Scrappy has been having a very difficult time eating, we have to feed her wet food and latley she has only been licking up the sauce, and sometimes she will get a picece of meat but then she will scream out in pain when eating, I feel so bad for her, I am crying right now just typing you. I want my cat to be pain free, I dont know want to give her up because I love her so much (I know that is very selfish), but I also dont want her to be in pain any longer! PLEASE any advice or links/resources to other sites, that can help us would be very much appreciated.

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      June 10, 2012 at 4:13 pm (5 years ago)

      I’m sorry about your Scrappy, Clorissa. If she’s having a tough time eating, you’re going to have to do something about the pain. I understand that cost is an issue. There are some organizations that help with veterinary expenses in situations like yours, it might be worth contacting some of them to see if you can get some help: http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/resources/tips/trouble_affording_veterinary_care.html The resource is a year old, so some of the information may be outdated.

      Steroid injections can help provide some temporary relief for stomatitis, and this may be something to discuss with your vet. Even though it’s not ideal because of the longterm effects of steroids, it would at least help your kitty feel better.

      Reply
      • Sue
        June 24, 2015 at 6:49 am (2 years ago)

        I would suggest the cortisone injections, my two year old Calico girl has stomatitis and it is very painful I didn’t realize what was wrong until I took her to the vet. It lasts about 7/8 weeks and she is pain free, doesn’t smell so bad and stops drooling, it’s your cheapest option.

        Reply
      • Sue
        June 24, 2015 at 6:54 am (2 years ago)

        I would really try steroids, my two year old calico ex feral kitty has this condition, I take her to the vet about every 7/8 weeks for her shots, you can tell when it’s flaring up as they start to drool and smell terrible, I try and not let it get that bad though. It may be your cheapest option and my kitty is pain free for that time.

        Reply
  13. Liz | Natural Cat Care Blog
    February 13, 2012 at 5:55 pm (6 years ago)

    Oh, this sounds awful. I didn’t have any education on this condition, Ingrid. Thank you for your thoughtful and helpful post about it.
    This makes me think about something…I have been reading the work of Dr. Natasha McBride lately. Her GAPS protocol has helped people with all kinds of immune disorders. She says that around 80-90% of the immune system is in the gut and believes we’ll eventually realize that most immune-related disorders can helped and even healed by healing the gut.
    That has been her experience in her practice and there are many testimonials all over the web. So something thing I might try if faced with this feline problem would be making the diet was very healthy for the cat’s digestion and getting some really good probiotic treatment going as well. Working in conjunction with a vet’s recommendations, of course.

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      February 13, 2012 at 6:41 pm (6 years ago)

      As you well know, Liz, I’m a proponent of a grain-free diet, which, in itself, promotes a healthy immune system. I also recommend using probiotics on a daily basis for that reason. Unfortunately, there’s no evidence, not even anecdotal, that I’m aware of at this point, that would indicate that diet makes any difference for stomatitis.

      Reply
  14. Marg
    February 13, 2012 at 2:14 pm (6 years ago)

    Thanks for this great post about stomatitis. I don’t know if you knew it or not, but my BB had stomatitis but only got it after her heart problems started. I do have a question for you about Buckley. Did she have the stomatitis before she had the heart problems or after you started treating her heart problems. I am just curious whether or not the Lasix has anything to do with it all. BB as negative on the FIV etc. They did recommend pulling all her teeth, but we decided to put her down because of all the complications of the heart etc. She could not eat at all and it was next to impossible to give her her medications. It was one of the saddest days of my life.

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      February 13, 2012 at 2:35 pm (6 years ago)

      Oh Marg, I’m so sorry about BB! It sounds like you made the right decision for her, but I understand how devastating that is.

      Buckley had stomatitis long before she was diagnosed with heart disease.

      Reply
  15. Layla Morgan Wilde (Cat Wisdom101)
    February 13, 2012 at 12:28 pm (6 years ago)

    Ingrid, there’s nothing more frustrating than not having all the clues about a disease. Thanks for shedding the light of awareness during pet dental month. Do you know anyone researching stomatitis? Early detection would be a godsend.

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      February 13, 2012 at 2:09 pm (6 years ago)

      Regular dental exams are probably the best early detection, Layla.

      Reply
      • Sue
        June 24, 2015 at 6:51 am (2 years ago)

        I would imagine the smell gives quite an early detection of it, it’s as if something dies in the cats mouth and they drool a lot.

        Reply
  16. Kathi
    February 13, 2012 at 7:33 am (6 years ago)

    We adopted an older cat with stomatitis, we didn’t know when we got him that he had this condition; I had never even heard of it. You are definitely correct, it is very frustrating to deal with. My fear is always that we are not doing enough to keep Murphy out of pain, I rotate anti-biotics with homeopathic meds. We have considered extraction, but my fear there is that I know it may not solve the problem…and it is $3000. It is really hard to know what is the best solution. Murphy only paws at his mouth very rarely and his appetite is very good so I think we are okay for now.

    Reply
    • Ingrid
      February 13, 2012 at 2:08 pm (6 years ago)

      Kathi, it’s such a tough condition to manage, and I understand your concern about the cost of extractions and not knowing whether it will take care of the problem. It sounds like you’re very much in tune with Murphy and you’ll proably catch any deterioration in his condition quickly. Hopefully, it won’t come to that and you can manage it the way you are so far.

      Reply

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  1. […] and for the last two years of her life, she had to have her teeth cleaned twice a year. Buckley had stomatitis, a condition in which the affected cat essentially becomes allergic to her own teeth. The outward […]

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